5 Healthy Habits You Can't Live Without

REGARDLES OF AGE

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Although some chronic illnesses are genetic, many debilitating ones are caused by lifestyle choices.  Poor lifestyle choices, such as smoking, overuse of alcohol, poor diet, lack of physical activity and inadequate relief of chronic stress are key contributors in the development and progression of preventable chronic diseases, including obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, cardiovascular disease and several types of cancer. 

The challenge with lifestyle health issues is that they can be extremely difficult to turn around.  At Total Wellness Resource Centerwe see many individuals who desire change but will attempt to change everything all at once, which is extremely difficult to accomplish - especially if trying this on their own. As a result, they often feel overwhelmed and quickly return to the comfort of their old habits.  But the good news is, healthy lifestyle modifications are possible with appropriate interventions, which include nutritional counseling, exercise training, and stress management techniques to improve outcomes for patients at risk and those who already have common chronic diseases.  Even though  Medical studies show that adults with common chronic conditions who participate in comprehensive lifestyle modification programs experience rapid, significant, clinically meaningful and sustainable improvements in biometric, laboratory and psychosocial outcomes. Not everybody body is willing or able to join such programs, so we encourage you to begin by taking baby steps - one habit at a time.  

5 HEALTHY HABITS

1. Start Your Day Out with  a Healthy Breakfast 

It sounds so flippant to make this step the number one health habit, but scientific studies show us that the way we start our day can effect every minute that follows.  Starting each morning with whole healthy nutrition is like screaming from a mountain top, "I value me and am worth investing in.Not to mention the impact of fueling your brain and body to operate at optimum performance.  

2. Breathe .  Yes, I said Breathe. 

Did you know that by practicing deep breathing meditation for 5 minutes a day you can improve your longevity?    Harvard Medical School neuroscientist Dr. Sara Lazur and her team conducted a study which showed that meditation changes the brain after only eight weeks. A scanned image showed increased thickening of four brain regions in the non-meditators after just eight weeks of participating in the meditation program.

3.. Drink plenty of water. 

Something as simple as drinking plenty of water can have life-changing health benefits.  The human body is made up of between 55-75% water so imagine the effects of limited water intake.  I tell my clients to visualize a plant that hasn't been watered properly for four weeks - now think of your body lacking adequate water for years.   Yes, we can experience so many benefits, such as Increases Energy & Relieves Fatigue, Promotes Weight Loss, Flushes Out Toxins, Improves Skin Complexion,  Maintains Regularity, Boosts Immune System, Natural Headache Remedy,  Prevents Cramps & Sprains, simply by drinking plenty of water. 

4. Get Active

Being active does not necessarily mean trips to the gym or heart pounding aerobic runs around the block.  But it can mean things as simple as choosing stairs over the elevator, standing vs. sitting,  parking a few parking spots further from the door.  Every extra step/stretch you do each day has benefits.  I have clients who choose to turn on the music while cleaning ( a faster beat can create faster movement resulting in more calorie burn)  the truth is we must keep moving if we want to keep moving.  It's Newton's first law of motion - sometimes referred to as the law of inertia. An object at rest stays at rest, and an object in motion stays in motion.   

 5. Sleep

As much as our body requires movement to stay healthy, it also requires time to rest and repair.  A group of experts from anatomy and physiology, as well as pediatrics, neurology, gerontology, and gynecology reached a consensus that most adults need 7- 9 hours a day ( varies from age group).  It has been proven that inadequate sleep effects weight, mental clarity, enhanced chronic illnesses, depression, and many other negative health factors.  By tying nutrition, exercise, and mental relaxation, you will see improvement on your ability to have a good nights sleep and your overall health.

Sounds pretty simple huh?  Well, unfortunately all change is hard and sustainable change can be even harder. We are committed to help sowe invite you to reach out to one of our health specialists to assist you with outlining your specific goals to get you started on your "Better Health - Better Life"  Journey.  YOU DESERVE IT 

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This Report Will Make You Rethink the Reson You Crave Food

50 Suggestions to help you stop the craving cycle.  

 

Free Guide available at the end of this blog.  Take advantage of this offer and take control of your life.

Food cravings aren’t as simple as some may believe. People are often told to use willpower or simply stop eating certain foods. However, cravings are often rooted in psychological, physical, or emotional needs. The first step to curbing your cravings is to figuring out what causes them and then why you can’t control the urges.

Outside factors such as manufacturers and advertising media have an effect on cravings. Sugar, salt, and the carbohydrates in processed foods make you want more. However, these aren’t the only reasons cravings can grab you when you least expect them.

They can be the result of a lack in nutrients or the environment we live in. It could be stress, emotions or conditioning that makes us crave different foods.

Cravings can be harmful in several ways. Some of the more common problems include weight gain, which can lead to high blood pressure, stroke, or heart disease. Another harmful outcome of cravings is addiction. Foods like sugar, and anything that breaks down into sugar such as alcohol, can be addictive and very difficult to be without.

There is good news though. Cravings can be controlled with hard work and changes in your diet and habits.

For instance, if you normally eat lots of processed foods, begin cooking your own meals to help control the amount of sugar, salt, and fats. Take advantage of fresh herbs and spices to add more flavor to your meals. Filling up on savory healthy meals every three hours or so will help curb your cravings.

Control your environment and the people you associate with as well. If you have trouble saying no in social situations, you may need to find new activities.

In the end, curbing your cravings can help you lead a healthy lifestyle.

Interested in learning more about controlling your cravings?  Click the link below and I will send you your free guide with over 50 ways to control your cravings.  If you have additional questions about nutrition please feel free to contact meat (310) 416-4107 or Cheri@totalwellnesscenter.net

 

For your FREE Guide on how to stop cravings fill out the form below and I will send it to the email address of your choice.   Congratulations on taking control of your cravings and your life.* NOTE:  Please insert Curb Cravings into the Subject box so you receive the right materials

 

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5 Things Sabotaging Your Diet

Taking Control of Your Weight Once and For All

1. Medical issues

First of all, it is important to rule out any hidden reasons or medical issues that may be hindering your weight loss.  There are reasons, other than your food intake, that can interfere with your body's natural processing ability.  Such issues as; thyroid disease, autoimmune, gut problems, even toxin build up in your liver can sabotage your weight-loss goals. These issues need to be diagnosed and treated prior to starting any weight loss program. 

2. You use willpower instead of science to control your appetite

Willing yourself to starve your body of adequate nutrition/calories accomplish two things - ramps up your cravings and slows down your metabolism.  You may lose some weight but sadly this is not sustainable.  Eating plenty of the right foods actually stimulates weight-loss.  This is why it is important to know which foods are best for your body type, activity level, and lifestyle.  No one diet fits all regardless of what the marketing campaign says.  

3. You may not be eating enough fat

Yes, you read that right.  Science has proven that by increasing your intake of healthy fats you actually burn more fat. So all those fat-free packaged foods you have eaten may be to blame for some of your extra pounds.  Why? because most fat-free products (including low-fat dairy) is loaded up with extra sugar, and sugar is the enemy to weight loss and your overall health.   Beware of product packages that claim to be sugar-free.  Many of these products have added chemicals, artificial sugars, and sugar alcohol that can pack on the pounds. 

4. You try to do it on your own

Research shows that you have a 97% higher chance to succeed  "if " you have a buddy doing the weight loss program with you or you are working with a coach who keeps you focused and accountable. Solo dieting has only a 6 % success rate. If you don't have a buddy that wants to do the same program check online - there are plenty of free weight-loss groups you can join. 

5. You don't have a plan

This is the number one reason most weight loss programs fail.  Everyone who starts a new diet has great intentions of reaching their goal.  But regardless, if you're a newbie to nutrition or you are up to speed on the latest food science, if you don't have a plan you will fail.  No, I am not just talking about a meal plan but rather how you plan to juggle your busy life style and have time to prepare 3 meals plus a snack. It is common to master this for the first few days, maybe even weeks, but all too often it becomes too much and we fall back to the convenience of fast food or prepackaged foods only to gain the weight back. 

In order to help you avoid this all too common pitfall, I have created a guide to Healthy Meal Planning and Preparation.   This guide is packed with great ideas and tips to ensure you are equipped for success with any diet plan - and it is yours FREE. Simply Fill out the form below click submit and I will email you your copy. 

*Note:  Please put "Free Guide to Healthy Meal Plan and Prep in Subject line to ensure you are sent the correct eBook.

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If you have any questions regarding what diet is right for you - please don't hesitate to contact me at Cheri@totalwellnesscenter.net or call my office (310) 461-4107 

Stay Healthy 

Natural Remedies for the Top 5 Aliments

Headache, Insomnia, Digestion, and More

Grow Your Own Health

Claim Your  Free Book at End of Article

 Many Years ago, it used to be that the majority of people relied on natural remedies. But then that sort of got pushed aside and modern medicine took over. There’s no doubt that modern medicine has done a lot of good.

But it’s not without its downside. Sometimes people end up over-medicated for health issues that can be treated simply and effectively at home.  A great way to treat some of the common health problems that affect people is through the natural use of plants.

These plants don’t give you the same dangerous side effects that a lot of the medications prescribed today cause. Plus, it’s easier and a lot more cost effective to turn to nature when you need healing.

There are a lot of different plants that you can grow to naturally treat your ailments and some can be applied topically while others can be brewed into teas. You should make sure that you understand how much to use, because, just like medicines from the pharmacy, there are dosing guidelines you will need to follow when using plants to treat ailments.

Headaches

A good natural treatment for a headache is the bark of a willow tree. You can grow a willow tree with a cutting from a mature tree. One of the reasons that this is effective is because it contains salicin, which is comparable to what you’ll find in aspirin. It’s also a good treatment for anything that causes you to feel pain since it works like aspirin does.

One drawback is that people who experience a reaction to aspirin could also potentially have a reaction to willow bark. It should not be used by nursing mothers or given to ill children due to the same side effects that aspirin can cause.

Lavender is a flowering plant that looks beautiful in a garden but it’s also a natural treatment for headaches - even if those headaches are migraines. It’s the oil from the plant that gives relief from the pain. It can be applied directly to the skin or inhaled by boiling the plant and inhaling the oils as they’re released. Lavender is safe to use on the skin without having to dilute it.

Another plant that you can grow to treat headaches is peppermint. This plant is used by crushing the leaves and applying the mixture to the area of the body where you feel the pain. The oils are absorbed through the skin.

If you’ve ever had to deal with cluster headaches, you know how bad these can be. These headaches, which show up and then come back repeatedly over the course of several weeks can be difficult to treat with modern medicine because as soon as you stop the treatment, you can end up with rebound headaches.

One of the best natural remedies that you can plant indoors or outdoors to help with these types of headaches is cayenne pepper. This plant contains capsaicin, which is used to relieve pain. It can be applied directly to the skin. However, you should be extremely careful to keep any of the plant from touching your face. If the plant comes in contact with your eyes, it can cause painful burning.

A side effect of this plant when applied topically is a burning sensation that does go away after a few minutes. If you’re prone to skin allergies, this may not be the right remedy for you to use.  Thyme, when made into a tea can also be used to relieve the pain associated with headaches. Bay leaves are helpful in treating headaches as well.

Insomnia

 Doctors recommend that you get between six to eight hours of sleep every night. This is what’s best for your body. When you have insomnia, it can take a toll on your personal and professional life, plus prolonged bouts of insomnia can cause your health to suffer. Persistent insomnia can lead to sleep deprivation behavior, which can be dangerous.

Fortunately, there are plants that treat this ailment. Many of these plants have a sedative qualites to them, which help relax your mind and body. As a result, you end up with a good night’s sleep.

One of these helpful plants is the lemon balm plant. If you look closely at the leaves, you’ll see how they resemble the leaves if the mint plant. This is because lemon balm is in the same family of plants as the mint. Just like mint It can be taken as a tea.

One flowering plant, that’s actually labeled as a weed is evening primrose - commonly called primrose. It is effective in treating insomnia. The flowers of the plant are colorful and quite beautiful. It’s best to grow this plant with outdoor gardening rather than indoor gardening because it thrives outdoors.

Another plant that’s well-known to aid in helping to treat insomnia is woodruff. This plant has small white flowers and is a perennial. It has a sweet scent and grows best in shade rather than direct sunlight.

Passionflower is another plant that you can grow that’s used in the treatment of insomnia. The plant has medicinal properties that are used to produce calmness and a state of relaxation, which helps you get some sleep.

There are some plants that you can grow that work toward helping you to get a good night’s sleep. These are plants that you can use during your waking hours that won’t induce sleepiness so you’ll still be able to go about your day.

What one of these plants does is it relieves stress and tension which are the leading causes of insomnia other than reasons related to diseases. This plant is rosemary and it can be grown indoor or outside but it can grow to some substantial height. So what you might want to do if you’re into indoor gardening is to start the plant inside and then transfer it outside once it gains height.

Fevers, Colds and Coughs

There can be many different reasons for your body to develop a fever. The same stands true for a cough. Unless a doctor finds that the fever has a direct cause, the only thing you can really do for it is to treat the symptom, which is the fever itself.

For the common cold, there is no cure. All you can do when you catch a cold is to try your best alleviate the symptoms. Many of the over the counter remedies that are offered can sometimes make you feel worse because they make you feel fuzzy-headed or they’ll make you feel dizzy.

Instead of reaching for the mass-produced medication, you can grow what you need to treat a fever, a cough or the common cold. And because this is a natural method, you won’t have any of those annoying side effects that come with taking medication. To treat a fever, the bark of the willow tree is good for this. Just like it treats headaches, it can also reduce your fever.

Again, the reason for this is because the bark of the tree is like aspirin with the properties it contains. But another natural remedy you can use that you can grow yourself is sunflowers. These plants make a great addition to a garden because of their beauty and multi-purpose usefulness.

The seeds from the plant can be eaten and they contain helpful qualities like some of the B vitamins, folate and zinc. Plus, they fight against cancer cells. They’re hardy and easy to grow. It’s the leaves of the plant that can be use to make a tea that lowers fevers. Besides treating the fever, the sunflower is also helpful for reducing ailments such as a cough and a cold. So if you have a fever that’s associated with a cold, then you’re getting two-fold relief with one plant.

Chamomile is another plant that you can grow that’s helpful in reducing fevers. These flowering plants look like daisies but they’re not exactly the same. They’re very hardy and easy to grow. They can be grown indoors but also flourish outside. The plant can be taken in a tea form and is good for not only reducing fever but in the treatment of a cold as well.

When you have a cold, even though it’s not a serious ailment, it can make you feel pretty miserable. Sunflowers can be used to treat this and so can ginseng. This plant is associated with Chinese medicine and has a long history of helping to treat ailments.

These his plants trigger the immune system to battle the ailment. As a result people who use it end up not being down with a cold or cough for the same length of time as those who didn’t use ginseng.

One of the annoying symptoms that always seems to come along with getting a cold is all the congestion that just makes you feel miserable. You don’t have to put up with that if you grow your own medicinal plants. Peppermint is a natural decongestant that contains menthol, which is the ingredient you’ll see in many of the over the counter medications that are used to treat cold symptoms.

A surprising plant that’s effective for a cold is parsley. This plant helps to minimize the symptoms and it stimulates your immune system at the same time. While these plants can be grown outdoors, they are attractive to outdoor animals like rabbits so you’ll want to protect them. Besides treatment for colds, this plant is great for relieving the symptoms associated with UTIs.

There’s nothing as annoying as a cough that comes along with a cold. Even after the cold is long gone the cough will often stubbornly remain in place. That’s because your upper respiratory system has been irritated.  Fennel is a plant that belongs with the celery family and is effective for treating coughs. This plant needs a lot of sunlight. It can be grown indoors but is better suited for outside gardening. Not only will you find this plant useful for treating coughs, but it can be a tasty addition to meals as well.

Anise is a small growing plant that’s perfect for growing indoors. To use this plant to treat a cough, you would use the seeds. After mashing the seeds, you would let them steep as if you were making a tea. Drinking the liquid calms a cough.

Thyme is also successfully used for treating coughing. This is a sturdy plant that grows easily. It’s a perennial plant and can be made into a tea . The reason that this plant works so well is because it calms muscle spasms. When you cough, especially repeatedly, this is caused by smooth muscle spasms. The thyme relaxes those muscles so you don’t feel like you have to cough.

Constipation and Diarrhea

When you are struggling with constipation, it can make you feel absolutely miserable. It can cause bloating, stomach cramps and make you feel sluggish. What happens when you take over the counter medication to treat this ailment is the side effects can often swing you all the way to the other end of the spectrum and you end up with diarrhea.

It might surprise you to know that a very effective plant that you can grow to treat constipation is aloe vera. Although this plant is widely known for its topical uses, the latex of the plant is extremely effective in curing constipation. One plant that’s considered a weed but is effective to treat constipation is the dandelion. The root of the dandelion is a natural laxative that won’t give you those harsh side effects like you get with over the counter medications. 

To get the benefit from this plant, you would need to boil the root. Be careful, it doesn’t take much to be effective. You only need about a teaspoon for every cup of boiling water. Be sure you strain out the root parts before you  pour it into a cup. Mild cases are often resolved with one to two cups of the tea.

To treat diarrhea naturally, you need to make a tea from blackberry leaves. These are very hardy plants that can be grown indoors or out. You can also use the leaves from a raspberry plant if you prefer that over growing blackberries.

Treating Skin Ailments

You want to take care of your skin because it’s what keeps germs from entering your body. There are several types of skin ailments that can be effectively treated with the use of plants. If you burn yourself cooking in the kitchen or through some other task, you’ll want to use an aloe vera plant.

To treat the burn, you break one of the leaves of the plant and use the gel contained within to cover the burn. Lavender is another plant that, like aloe vera, can be effectively used to treat non-serious burns. Besides burns, there are other skin ailments that can cause you discomfort. For example, anyone who’s ever dealt with eczema knows how irritating it can be.

Dandelions can be used to treat this skin condition as well as peppermint. You would use the dandelion as a tea to treat eczema. The oil from a peppermint plant is applied topically to the affected area. The oil reduces the itching as well as the inflammation caused by the condition. The goldenrod flower has also been used to treat eczema.

Along with skin irritants like burns and eczema, you might battle fungal conditions. This is used topically to treat the fungal infection. Chamomile, when used as a bath can be used as an anti-fungal medication. Cloves are also good for treating fungal conditions.  Oregano leaves can also be used to treat fungal infections especially those that infect the toenails or fingernails. This plant can be grown indoor or outdoors also as well as a food spice.

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Is Kale the True Superfood?

Or Is There More To The Story?

I am thrilled to learn from the latest research that there are 10 Superfoods Better for you Than Kale. Yippee - since I failed to ever become its fan.  And, yes, this made me an outsider because in the food world, the biggest celebrity of all has been kale.  In fact, I heard Kale referred to as the Lady Gaga of leafy greens.  Don’t get me wrong ...... it has its benefits but the brilliant marketing behind this leafy green has elevated it beyond its star quality - Here’s a report of the 10 leafy green cousins that researchers say pack a greater nutritional wallop:

 Whole Story

Whole Story

(As reported by Eat This, Not That) 

Collard Greens:

A staple vegetable of Southern U.S. cuisine, collard greens also boast incredible cholesterol-lowering benefits — especially when steamed. A recent study published in the journal Nutrition Research compared the effectiveness of the prescription drug Cholestyramine to steamed collards. Incredibly, the collards improved the body’s cholesterol-blocking process by 13 percent more than the drug! Of course, that won’t do you any good if you insist on serving them with ham hocks….

Romaine Lettuce: 

Even more so than its cousin kale, the humble Romaine lettuce packs high levels of folic acid, a water-soluble form of Vitamin B that’s proven to boost male fertility. A study published in the journal Fertility and Sterility found supplemental folic acid to significantly increase sperm counts. Get the man in your life to start craving Caesar salads, and you may soon have a baby Julius on board. (Ladies, this green packs health benefits for you, too! Folate also plays a role in battling depression, so change out your kale for Romaine.

Parsley:

 Yes, that leafy garnish that sits on the side of your plate—the one they throw away after you eat the rest of your meal—is a quiet superfood, so packed with nutrients that even that one sprig can go a long way toward meeting your daily requirement for vitamin K. Moreover, research suggests the summer-y aroma and flavor of chopped parsley may help control your appetite. A study in the journal Flavourfound participants ate significantly less of a dish that smelled strongly of spice than a mildly scented version of the same food. Adding herbs, like parsley, creates the sensory illusion that you’re indulging in something rich—without adding any fat or calories to your plate.

Leaf lettuce:

The nutritional Clark Kent of the salad bar, this common and unsuspecting leafy green is ready to take its place among the superfoods for weight loss. Two generous cups of lettuce provides 100 percent of your daily vitamin K requirement for strong, healthy bones. A report from the Nurses’ Health Study suggests that women who eat a serving of lettuce every day cut the risk of hip fracture by 30 percent than when compared with eating just one serving a week.

Chicory:   

Chicory is a family of bitter greens, but its most well-known member is radicchio, the small red or purple leaf that comes in a head about the size of a softball. It’s one of the best dietary sources of polyphenols—powerful micronutrients that serve a role in preventing disease. A study in the Journal of Nutritionfound that people who consume 650 mg a day of polyphenols have a 30 percent chance at living longer than those who consume less than that. A cup of chicory leaves clocks in at about 235 mg , so consider adding a little leafy red into your leafy greens. 

Spinach:

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, a 180 gram serving of boiled spinach provides 6.43 mg of iron, the muscle mineral—that’s more than a 6 oz hamburger patty! Recent research also suggest compounds in the leaf membranes called thylakoids may serve as a powerful appetite suppressant. A recently published long-term study at Lund University in Sweden found that having a drink containing thylakoids before breakfast could significantly reduce cravings and promote weight loss. On average, the women who took the extract lost 5.5 pounds more than the placebo group over the course of three months.

 

Beet greens:

Yes, the stuff they cut off and throw in the garbage before charging you an arm and a leg for “beet salad.” A scant cup of the bitter green serves up nearly 5 grams of fiber—that’s more than you’ll find in a bowl of Quaker oats! Researchers at the University of Leeds found that risk of cardiovascular disease was significantly lower for every 7 grams of fiber consumed. Try them in stir frys and eat to your heart’s content!

 

Chard:

Sounds like “burnt.” It’s not as fun a name to drop as, say, “broccolini,” but it might be your best defense against diabetes. Recent research has shown that these powerhouse leaves contain at least 13 different polyphenol antioxidants, including anthocyanins–anti-inflammatory compounds that could offer protection from type 2 diabetes. Researchers from the University of East Anglia analyzed questionnaires and blood samples of about 2,000 people and found that those with the highest dietary intakes of anthocyanins had lower insulin resistance and better blood glucose regulation.

 

Chinese Cabbage:

Taking the silver medal in the powerfood Olympics is Chinese cabbage, also called Napa or celery cabbage. Rich sources of highly-available calcium and iron, cruciferous vegetables like the cabbage have the powerful ability to “turn off” inflammation markers thought to promote heart disease. In a study of more than 1,000 Chinese women, published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, those who ate the most cruciferous vegetables (about 1.5 cups per day) had 13 percent less inflammation than those who ate the least.

Super Hero Watercress:

The top dog, the unrivaled champion, the chairman of the cutting board, watercress may also be the closest thing yet to a true anti-aging food. Gram for gram this mild-tasting and flowery-looking green contains four times more beta carotene than an apple, and a whopping 238 percent of your daily recommended dose of vitamin K per 100 grams—two compounds that keep skin dewy and youthful. The beauty food is also the richest dietary source of PEITC (phenylethyl isothiocyanate), which research suggests can fight cancer. Results from an eight-week trial published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggest daily supplementation of 85 grams of raw watercress (that’s about two cups) could reduce DMA damage linked to cancer by 17 percent. Exposure to heat may inactivate PEITC, so it’s best to enjoy watercress raw in salads, cold-pressed juices, and sandwiches.

This report is a great example how "Marketing" can skew the facts to benefit one's own interest.  Keep on track of the facts and sign up for our newsletter below. 

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5 Healthy Breakfast Tips

That Will Help You Lose Weight

breakfast.jpg

Start Your Day Out Right  

If you want to lose weight, or you just want to get healthy, then breakfast should be number one on your list. Even if you're exercising every day, you could be sabotaging your plans by skipping breakfast! And, if you do eat breakfast every day, you may be choosing the wrong foods. Here are 5 healthy breakfast tips to make that first meal of the day a healthy one.

  • Never Skip Breakfast: This is number one on the list of healthy breakfast tips for a very good reason! You may think you're shaving calories off your day by missing breakfast, but it just leaves you more likely to snack on unhealthy foods throughout the morning. Above this, breakfast kickstarts your metabolism, making your body work harder to burn off calories from the meals you eat through the rest of the day. Start with a combination of lean protein and simple carbs with a serving of fruit and you will be set until Lunch time.

 

  • Avoid Sugar: Many of us wrongly assume that all breakfast cereals are healthy. This is far from the truth: many of them are overloaded with sugar. This can lead to weight gain and energy spikes that will leave you feeling sleepy by lunch time. A simple trick to alleviating sweet attacks is to eat ½ an avocado with light salt…..this will leave you satisfied and the healthy fats are much better for you in the long run.

 

  • Don't Drink Too Much Juice: Although fruit juice is good for you, this doesn't mean that it's free from calories. The sugar in fruit juice can cause an energy spike, so stick to a small glass and drink water to hydrate you for the day. Drinking more water has the added benefit of helping you to feel fuller and avoid snacking.  If you choose Juice make certain it is fresh squeezed juice with added greens.  See my Juicing guide to get amazing healthy recipes.

 

  • Start your day like you are starting a race.  Think of breakfast as a kick-start fuel for your day, and start with healthy foods that'll give your body the nutrients you need to sustain energy.  This means avoiding processed or junk food that’ll leave you feeling sluggish at work. Processed foods are most foods that come from a box or can…….. Go Fresh

 

  •  Include A Few Superfoods: Superfoods are ingredients known to greatly decrease your risk of developing a range of diseases. Thankfully, many of these are perfect for breakfast. Here are a few top ingredients to get you going: oats, yogurt, veggies ( love Breakfast salads), berries, nuts and seeds. Even if you only have a handful of these ingredients, it's a good way to make sure you get something healthy into every day.

 

If all these healthy breakfast tips seem time consuming for your busy schedule, remember to plan ahead. If necessary, prepare your breakfast the night before to make it as easy as possible for you to stick to a healthy diet. Watch for my up and coming plan and prepare blog. 

 I am always looking for new healthy breakfast recipes so if you have one you’d like to share with our readers please submit it to connect@totalwellnesscenter.net and write Recipe in the subject line.  

 

As always , we love to hear from you so feel free to write us in the comment box below.  Have a healthy day.

 

 

 

 

 

The One Superfood That's Actually Worth The Money (According to Registered Dietitians)

We love playing around with superfoods in the kitchen, but it can get expensive. We asked registered dietitians to weigh in on their absolute favorite, so you can kick your collection off on the right note.

Article by Liz Moody

Turmeric

 Photo: Stocksy

Photo: Stocksy

I think turmeric is worth it. I sprinkle it everywhere—in smoothies, teas, on roasted veggies and soups and marinades too. The mood benefits are insane (curcumin, the active ingredient, has been found as beneficial for mood disorders as Prozac), as are the anti-inflammatory, whole-body benefits. Black pepper also increases turmeric absorption, so i try to have a sprinkle of it wherever possible. Try to buy organic, and the whole root will be more nutritious than most shelf-stable powders. 

Carolyn Brown, R.D., founder of FoodTrainers

Cacao

I'm a big believer in sourcing the highest quality and unadulterated as well as sustainably and ethically sourced ingredients that provide the most bioavailable and absorbable nutrients, and this alone usually comes with a hefty price tag. It can be hard to factor quality today, though, with the explosion of superfood products and companies. If I'm being completely honest, though, the superfood that I use almost on a regular basis is cacao. There is nothing I crave more that provides me with the core minerals, mood-lifting, and energizing benefits, and for that result I will happily pay top dollar for both the fermented raw bean, or unprocessed raw bar that has been sweetened with unrefined sugars. 
 

Alle Weil, AADP, founder of Flora Ex Machina

Flaxseed

  Photo: Stocksy

Photo: Stocksy

Flaxseeds are best absorbed when ground and provide many benefits to the diet. They are a great source of fiber and help things move along in the digestive tract. Flaxseeds are also are a great vegan source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are protective of the cardiovascular system by preventing and healing vascular damage related to inflammation. The anti-inflammatory properties of ground flaxseeds are not only limited to the cardiovascular system but assist the body in fighting free radicals, which lead to oxidative stress. Consuming anti-inflammatory foods helps to reduce the risk of certain cancers and diseases related to chronic inflammation. Flaxseeds are also a source of plant-based protein and are easily integrated into the diet. Throw them into a smoothie, top your oatmeal or yogurt with them, or add them to healthified baked goods or pancakes. 

Miranda Hammer, R.D., founder of Crunchy Radish

Spices

Spices! While spices aren't a solo superfood, collectively they are antioxidant superstars, and I try and incorporate them into everything. Remember, antioxidants are the "good guys" that scavenge dangerous free radicals that can otherwise cause damage on the cellular level. Plus they add a ton of delicious natural flavor to any given dish. If you can't take the heat, remember that spices don't have to actually be spicy. Think cinnamon, turmeric, basil, garlic powder, etc. I add cinnamon to my morning coffee, oatmeal, and smoothies. Garlic powder and turmeric are great in homemade soups, whole grain pastas, vegetable sides, and even omelets. The key is to make sure your spice cabinet is stocked and easily accessible, so you remember to use them!
 

Leah Silberman, R.D., founder of Tovita Nutrition

Collagen

I think purchasing superfoods is a wise investment into our health. When we place importance on consuming superfoods, naturally nutrient dense and full of health-boosting phytochemicals, we are really investing well into our health and prevention of diseases! If I could pick one in particular, I'd have to say collagen powder. It is incredibly rich in amino-acids that provide the body with many health-boosting benefits, and the powder dissolves so well into all kinds of foods it's virtually undetectable (unlike many other protein powders on the market).  
 

—Cristal Sczebel, CHN, founder of Nutritionist In The Kitch

Bone broth

Bone broth.jpg

Bone broth is truly a superfood, it has so many healing properties. While the bones are simmering, collagen, glycine, and glutamine all get released into the broth. The collagen in the broth helps your skin, hair, and nails look beautiful. It evens helps reduce cellulite and wrinkles! On top of that, the nutrients in bone broth help to heal your gut (which boosts your immune system since about 70 to 80 percent of your immune system lives in your gut!) and reduce inflammation.

Bone broth also contains a variety of different nutrients such as magnesium, phosphorus, and iron that are bioavailable to your body. You know that expensive supplement glucosamine and chondroitin that's recommended for joint health? Well, bone broth is loaded with it. That doesn't even complete the list of benefits—bone broth can also help with sleep, detoxification, metabolism, and anxiety.

Drink a cup daily or add it to your soups, stews, or veggie dishes. If you're going to purchase bone broth only, purchase homemade batches, from a co-op or a quality meat market. Even better, it's very simple to make yourself (and far more affordable!). 

Britni Thomas, R.D., of Nutritional Weight & Wellness

Chia seeds

A great source of omega-3 fatty acid ALA (the plant-based form), these tiny seeds are also packed with filling fiber and even provide some calcium and protein. They’re great for adding staying power to oatmeal, yogurt, and smoothies. Because they absorb so much water and easily form a gel, they’re also useful as an egg substitute or binding agent in baked goods or as a simple way to thicken sauces and beverages.
 

—Jessica Cording, R.D., founder of Jessica Cording Nutrition

One Day of Clean Eating - Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner, and 2 healthy snacks all under 1500 calories

Breakfast

Egg roll ups with mango 

  • 3 whole cage free eggs
  • 5 Egg whites
  • 3 Tablespoons Greek Yogurt
  • 1 peeled, seeded, and diced mango 
  • 3 diced green onions (white part)
  • 1 oz  shredded cheddar cheese ( optional) 
  • 4TBS chopped fresh cilantro 
  • 1/2 tsp cumin 
  • 1/2 tsp onion powder 
  • Himalayan pink sea salt
  • Black pepper 
  • Corn tortillas

Place 2-3 Eggs & 5 Egg Whites in a medium bowl and mix together with a fork, add greek yogurt, cumin, onion powder.  Season with salt and pepper to taste. Fold in 1/2 of the diced mango along with chopped green onions into egg mixture. Heat a nonstick skillet over med-high heat. Stir in eggs and cook until scrambled, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. 

Slightly Toast the tortillas in a skillet over med-high heat for about a minute, or until heated. Transfer to a plate. Divide eggs among the tortillas, roll, and top with cilantro, 1/2 mango, and a spoonful of greek yogurt if desired.

Snack

  • 1 slice Ezekiel toast with 1 tbsp. peanut or almond butter (Ezekeil is not gluten free, so avoid it if you are going gluten free)
  • ½ banana

Lunch

Avocado Chicken Salad

  • 1/2 Avocado, sliced
  • 4 oz. grilled chicken
  • 1 cup arugula 
  • 1/4 shredded carrots
  • 1/4 cup bean sprouts
  • 1/4 shredded jicama
  • 1/4  peeled and diced  cucumbers
  • 2 tbsp. olive oil & balsamic vinegar
  • Mix ingredients in medium sized bowl and serve.

May be served on cucumber slices.

Snack  

  • 1 medium apple and handful raw almonds

Dinner  

Teriyaki Salmon Bowl  

Ingredients

  • 2 salmon fillets - 4-6 oz each 

Sauce

  • 2 Tbsp liquid Amino (braggs) 
  • 2 Tbsp rice Vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp sherry
  • 1½ tsp honey
  • 1½ tsp water
  • 1 tsp cornstarch

The bowl

  • 1 cup of cooked brown Jasmine
  • 2 cups fresh greens (I use arugula but spinach is great) 
  • ½ avocado, sliced
  • ¼ cup fresh edamame, shelled 
  • 1 carrot, grated
  • 2 TBSP sesame seeds
  • 1 green onion, (white and green parts)

Preheat oven to 400F. Prepare a baking sheet with aluminum foil or parchment paper and set aside. In a small pan over medium heat combine liquid amino, rice vinegar, sherry and honey. While mixture is heating,  in a separate small bowl whisk together cornstarch and water. Add cornstarch mixture to amino mixture and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and continue to stir frequently until sauce reaches desired thickness (about 2-3 min.) Place salmon fillets (skin side down) on prepared baking sheet, brush on sauce . Reserving any unused teriyaki sauce to drizzle over finished bowl. Place salmon in oven and cook for approx. 12- 15 min.  You can remove skin if desired after cooked. To assemble bowls, heat up cooked rice and divide between bowls. Top with salmon, greens, carrot, edamame, avocado, sesame seeds, and green onions. Drizzle any remaining teriyaki sauce over bowl if desired.

Salmon Recipe  inspired by Simply Healthy Kitchen

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Clean Eating Course 101

From diet books and recipes to your Instagram feed, the clean eating trend seems to be everywhere lately. Read on to find out what it's all about and if it's really worth trying.

Defining Clean Eating

Maybe a new raw cafe has sprung up in your neighborhood, or you read about Katy Perry and Gwyneth Paltrow being fans. Either way, eating "clean" is gaining traction — but what does it actually mean, and how is it good for the body?

Clean eating is a deceptively simple concept. Rather than revolving around the idea of ingesting more or less of specific things (for instance, fewer calories or more protein), the idea is more about being mindful of the food's pathway between its origin and your plate. At its simplest, clean eating is about eating whole foods, or "real" foods — those that are un- or minimally processed, refined, and handled, making them as close to their natural form as possible. However, modern food production has become so sophisticated that simply eating whole foods can be a challenging proposition these days.

What Counts as Processed Foods?

First, let's start with the definition of processed food. "Processing" includes:

Additions of any kind — everything from salt, sugar, and fat to aid flavor and mouthfeel, to preservatives that keep food from spoiling too quickly, to the vitamins enriching everything from beverages to breakfast cereal. 
Changing the form of the natural food — for instance, removing the bran and germ from whole grains to create refined bread, mashing apples into applesauce, or stir-frying veggies.
Foods with components manufactured in a lab. (You probably don't need clarification on this one, but if the ingredient list has stuff you can't recognize or pronounce, that's a pretty solid indication that it's not natural).

In that light, processed food includes everything from a hot dog (where do we even begin?) to jarred organic pasta sauce and instant oatmeal. And yes, changing the form of natural food includes cooking as well, so even your steamed broccoli is technically processed, albeit minimally.

So why, exactly, is processing so bad — especially if it's something as simple as adding heat?

Why Is Processed Food Bad?

In two words: It's not. Or rather, not categorically.

"Processing is not always bad," says Jessica Fanzo, assistant professor of nutrition at Columbia University. "Often processing removes toxins or bacteria, or allows for us to eat certain types of foods in off-season due to freezing or canning." (Pasteurized milk, anyone?) Processing "can also include altering the consistency or taste of food to make it more appealing," Fanzo adds. So that delicious post-workout kale-celery-spinach- banana smoothie  you had? Enjoy that virtuous feeling knowing that you were likely able to down that giant amount of greens because your treat was somewhat processed.

Still, even though pasteurized milk, kale smoothies, and instant oatmeal are all processed, that doesn't make them on par with doughnuts and Diet Coke.

"The key is to avoid foods that are 'ultra-processed,'" says Fanzo — basically, anything food-product-like or ready-to-heat."

The Problem with Ultra-Processed Foods

As you can probably guess, the health problems associated with ultra-processed food are numerous. Foods with genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been linked to cancer and infertility; highly processed foods are stripped of nutrients needed for overall health; and heavily modified food tends to have additives that overstimulate the production of dopamine, the "pleasure" neurotransmitter, perpetuating a negative cycle of constant junk food cravings.

However, there's added reason for pause when reaching for the Pop-Tart.

In a 2011 article published in the Journal of the World Public Health Nutrition Association, Carlos Monteiro, professor at the Department of Nutrition of the School of Public Health at the University of Sao Paulo, argues that having ultra-processed foods touted in a way that makes it seem good for you — less sodium! no trans fats! vitamin-enriched! — actually causes more damage to our collective understanding of healthy eating than we may realize. Considering the increasing abundance of "healthfully" enhanced products in the grocery aisles (or perhaps even your refrigerator), Monteiro may be on to something.

The Perks of Clean Eating

Thanks to extensive research that has linked eating whole foods with good health, "we do know that largely plant-based diets are healthy," says Fanzo. Multiple studies have shown that diets heavy on fruits and vegetables can curb or prevent certain life-threatening conditions and diseases, such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Plus, there's research linking diets high in fruits and veggies to healthy weight management and glowing skin and hair — as if you needed more motivation.

Clean eating.jpg

How to Eat Clean

Unprocessed foods include:

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Dried legumes
  • Nuts
  • Farm-fresh eggs

Minimally processed foods include:

  • Unrefined grains, like whole wheat bread and pasta, popcorn, steel-cut oatmeal, quinoa, and brown rice
  • Frozen fruits and vegetables
  • Unprocessed meat; wild over pastured, pastured over grain-fed
  • Hormone-free dairy
  • Oils

Pesticide-free organic food is preferable to avoid consuming added hormones or chemicals. It's also important to note that eating clean doesn't give you free reign to eat endless quantities. They may be healthy, but they still have calories!

"You always have to think about portion size," says Marissa Lippert, RD, owner of Nourish Kitchen + Table, a seasonally influenced cafe in New York City. "I always encourage people to think of their plate in terms of fifths: three-fifths should be fruits and vegetables, one-fifth should be protein, and one-fifth healthy carbs."

How to Shop Clean

Realistically, eating clean doesn't mean you need to eat everything raw and straight from the ground. It means choosing minimally processed foods with few ingredients on the label, if it has a label at all.

If you're shopping around the perimeter of the grocery store, that's always a good start, says Lippert.

When perusing the main aisles for packaged foods, ask yourself: Where did this food or its ingredients come from? How much has it been processed or handled? The ingredient label should be short, and all ingredients should be recognizable. Scan for easy-to-avoid additives like artificial coloring and flavors.

How to Cook Clean

Cooking does alter your food, but it isn't necessarily a bad thing.

"While it's true that some nutrients are lost during cooking, like vitamin C, other nutrients are increased when foods are cooked, like lycopene, so it's best to eat a wide variety of foods, in both their raw and cooked forms," says EA Stewart, RD, who blogs at The Spicy RD.

When cooking food, "the focus should be on maintaining the integrity of what you are consuming and avoiding high-fat cooking methods such as deep-frying or stewing in animal or vegetable fats," says Miranda Hammer, a New York City registered dietitian and author of food blog The Crunchy Radish.

When cooking, opt for flash-cook methods such as stir-frying and ones without additives like steaming. For fruits and veggies, raw is best, but steaming is a close second in terms of preserving nutritional value and keeping the food's natural integrity.

The Paleo Lifestyle

The Paleo diet, which promotes eating only foods as our ancestors did during the Paleolithic era, is similar to a clean diet in that they both advocate whole foods. However, the Paleo diet limits food to pre-Industrial Revolution, meaning it prohibits all grains (not just refined ones), legumes, and dairy products, which clean eating does not.

While there are many personal testimonials that Paleo works, some experts are skeptical. "I don't think we need to all eat meat," says Fanzo. Moreover, "banishing major food groups makes no sense from a physiologic point of view. It sets a person up for failure and rebounding weight."

The Whole 9 Lifestyle and Whole 30

Founded in 2009 by a couple in Texas, the Whole 9 lifestyle is based on nine principles that contribute to a balanced life. Nutrition is one of the core factors, and the lifestyle's eating recommendation is one of whole foods, like meat, eggs, vegetables, fruit, healthy oils, nuts, and seeds.

If you're new to Whole 9, it kicks off with a 30-day detox called Whole 30, in which whole foods are eaten but all alcohol, sugar, grains, legumes, and dairy are eliminated to "push the reset button with your metabolism, systemic inflammation, and the downstream effects of the food choices you've been making."

Experts like Fanzo see the elimination of entire food groups (as with the Paleo diet) as problematic. For some people, though, a short cut-off may help them get in the right "healthy eating" mind-set.

"If a brief, up to one week abstinence from certain foods — not all foods! — helps people get in the right mind-set to eat healthier, and they don't have any medical conditions, then I think this is fine from a health and nutrition standpoint," says Stewart. "However I don't think it is necessary, and in many cases it sets people up for an 'all or nothing' approach to their diets."

To receive the latest information on "Clean Eating" sign up for our newsletter.  We love to hear from you so feel free to drop us a line in the comment box below.

Be Healthy,

Total Wellness Resource Center 

Original article was published in Fitness Magazine . Author : Joselyn Voo

New "Limited Time Offer" Buddy Program

2017 Eat  Healthy - Get Fit  

Our exciting new  "2017 Eat Healthy - Get Fit" Program is built on a foundation of science based nutrition and  the proven "buddy system"  that allows you and a friend to achieve individual health goals while working along side a personal Wellness and Nutrition Coach.  

Studies over the years have shown that when 2 people or more team up to lose weight and get fit together they are more successful than individuals who go it alone. A study from Indiana University showed that the 12-month drop-out rate for "buddies" participating in a fitness program was just 6 percent, compared to 43 percent among individuals who tried doing it in their own.  

Are you ready to  live your New Year's resolution and get fit ?  Then grab a friend and  lets get started.  

Limited Time Offer

Buy one - 

and get the second one FREE!

Jump Start Program includes:

  • Nutrition Profile Evaluation & Wellness Assessment  through personal computer log-in portal with Total Wellness. 
  • One-hour Initial Consultation via skype 
  • Individual goal setting with detailed action strategy and measurable.
  • Personalized Meal plan
  • 4-week grocery list
  • Food accountability journaling 
  • Daily motivational emails or texts
  • 2 weekly 30-minute Coaching Sessions via skype or phone 
  • Unlimited access to coach via text or email.
  • Access to original healthy  recipes 
  • Final Success Review with move forward action plan.

Offer Ends February 4h

Join Our Recipe Contest

Submit and Win

$500.00 in Prizes 

All WINNING RECIPES will be PUBLISHED in our new recipe book scheduled for release in the summer 2017

"Indulge Mediterranean Style"  

Participate by submitting your original "Mediterranean inspired" recipe in the form below.  We are accepting recipes in the following category:

  • Appetizers
  • soups
  • salads
  • main dishes
  • side dishes
  • dips
  • sauces
  • dressings
  • desserts
  • snacks.

 Recipe Contest Official Rules 

1. Contest Begins:  February 01, 2017 12:01 AM and  Ends: May 10, 2017  11:59 PM

2. Eligibility: This Contest is open to everyone who is 18 years of age or older at time of entry. This Contest is sponsored by TWRC (Employees, officers and directors of Sponsor and its subsidiary companies, judging agents and promotion partners, and their immediate families (parents, children, siblings, spouse) or members of the same household (whether related or not) of such employees/officers/directors are not eligible to participate. Contest  is void in the areas where prohibited by law or otherwise regulated.

3. How to Enter: Contest begins at 12:01 am Eastern Time on February 01, 2017 and ends at 11:59 pm Eastern Time on May 10, 2017 (the "Deadline Date"). All entries must be received by 11:59 pm Eastern Time on the Deadline Date. To enter complete the form below. Entries submitted in geographic areas in which the entry is not legally permissible will be disqualified. If entries do not contain all necessary information, entrant will be disqualified. Please be certain to follow all directions. Eligible persons can enter as many original recipes in this Contest as they wish. Sponsor is the official timekeeper for this Contest. 

All recipes must be the original work of entrant and not previously published. You may use other recipes for inspiration, but you must make your own unique ingredient and cooking instruction changes in order for the recipe to be considered. Each submitted recipe must not infringe the copyright, trademark, privacy, publicity or other intellectual property rights of any person or entity. All entries become the physical property of Sponsor and will not be returned. By submitting a recipe for this Contest, you grant Sponsor, its parent company, subsidiaries, affiliates, partners and licensees unrestricted use of the submitted entry which includes the right to publish your recipe and any other information provided worldwide in all print and electronic media (now or hereafter existing) without time limitation, and the right to include your name and hometown (e.g., city and state) in connection therewith. Sponsor reserves the right to edit, modify, translate, reproduce and distribute the submitted material in any medium and in any manner as it deems appropriate. Sponsor tests selected recipes and reserves the right to alter them as it deems appropriate. Sponsor may contact you via phone or email regarding your submission.

4. Judging: The winner of the Contest will be determined by judging all qualifying entrants' submissions based on the following criteria:

Taste: 25%

Does this recipe taste great with every bite? Does it have mass appeal? Would you want to make this recipe over and over again based on taste alone? Does it contain interesting, yet gratifying flavor combinations?

Visual Appeal: 25%

Does this recipe present beautifully on a plate or in a baking dish? Do your eyes make you want to eat this before you even smell or taste it? 

Mediterranean cuisine 25% 

Does the recipe follow the guidelines of a "healthy Mediterranean dish "that brings out your inner greek-ness and causes you to shout "OPA"

Overall appeal: 25%

Does your recipe appeal to fellow home cooks everywhere? Does the recipe have easy-to-find everyday ingredients and is it easy to make? Does the recipe have a story that will inspire many others to make it?

All entries will be judged using the criteria stated above. In the event of a tie, the highest scoring entry in the Creativity category will be the winner. All judging will be accomplished by a panel of TWRC Advisory "Foodie" Committee Decision of the judges is final and binding on all matters relating to this Contest.

5. Winners and Prizes: A total of 12 winners will be selected: One Grand Prize winner (1st Place) will be awarded $250; One second place winner will be awarded $100. One third place winner will be awarded $50 and nine honorable mentions will each win a copy of the "Indulge Mediterranean Cookbook. Each winner agrees that the publishing rights granted above will be exclusive to Sponsor, its parent company, subsidiaries, affiliates, partners and licensees for use in any magazine and/or cookbook in any media (now or hereafter existing) for a period of one year after the date a prize is awarded; following such period, such publishing rights shall continue on a non-exclusive basis. Each prize is not transferable and cannot be assigned or substituted. Sponsor reserves the right to substitute a similar prize of equal or greater value in the event that the stated prize cannot be awarded due to circumstances beyond the control of the Sponsor. All taxes, if any, are the winners' responsibility. Sponsor will not be responsible for any loss, liability or damage arising out of the winners' acceptance or use of the prize(s). All prizes are guaranteed to be awarded, assuming a sufficient number of qualifying entries is received and meet the minimum judging criteria.

6. Selection of Winner: Winners will be determined and notified on or about  September 01, 2017 by regular mail and/or email. Any winner may be required to execute a Statement of Eligibility and Release and Payment Authorization within 21 days of prize notification attempt or winner will be disqualified and prize may be awarded to an alternate winner.

In the event winner is a minor in his or her place of residence, all required documentation must be signed by parent or legal guardian. Return of prize or prize notification as undeliverable will result in disqualification and an alternate winner may be selected. Entry and/or acceptance of prize(s) constitutes permission for the Sponsor and its agencies (if any) to use the winner's name, hometown (e.g., city and state) and/or likeness for advertising and trade purposes without further compensation or authorization, worldwide and in perpetuity, in any and all forms of media, now known and hereafter devised, unless prohibited by law.

7. Conditions: Sponsor is not liable for any malfunctions or failures of any telephone network or lines, computer internet system, servers or providers, computer equipment, software, failure of any email on account of technical problems or traffic congestion on the internet or at any website, or any combination thereof, including any injury or damage to participant's or any other person's computer related to or resulting from participation or downloading/uploading any materials relating to this Contest, or other technical difficulties or failures or other errors of any kind. Sponsor reserves the right to terminate or modify the Contest at any time for any reason. In such a circumstance, all winners will be selected based on entries received to date of termination. Sponsor also reserves the right to modify this Contest in the event an insufficient number of entries are received and/or an insufficient number of entries meet the minimum judging criteria.

In the event that two similar entries are received, only the entry judged to best meet criteria as set by Sponsor will be included in the final judging. Entrants agree to indemnify Sponsor, its affiliated and subsidiary companies from and against any and all claims and liabilities arising out of or in connection with this Contest. In the event of any dispute regarding the identity of an entrant who submitted an online entry, the authorized account holder of the email address used for the entry at the time of entry will be deemed the entrant. "Authorized account holder" is defined as the natural person who is assigned to an email address by an internet access provider, online service provider, or other organization (e.g. business, educational institute) that is responsible for assigning email addresses for the domain associated with the submitted email address. Any potential winner may be requested to provide Sponsor with proof that such winner is the authorized account holder of the email address associated with the winning entry. Sponsor, in its sole discretion, reserves the right to disqualify any person tampering with the operation of the website or the entry process.

8. No Recourse to Judicial or Other Procedures/Severability: To the extent permitted by law, the rights to litigate, to seek injunctive relief or to make any other recourse to judicial or any other procedure in case of disputes or claims resulting from or in connection with this Contest are hereby excluded, and any entrant expressly waives any and all such rights. In the event that a court of competent jurisdiction finds the foregoing waiver unenforceable, entrants hereby consent to the jurisdiction and venue residing exclusively within entrants location and agree that any and all disputes, claims, and causes of action arising out of or connected with this Contest or any prize awarded shall be resolved individually, without resort to any form of class action. Entrants agree that these Official Rules are governed by the laws of California. If any provision(s) of these Official Rules are held to be invalid or unenforceable, all remaining provisions hereof will remain in full force and effect.

By submitting your recipe to Total Wellness Resource Center you are agreeing to the terms within the above rile statement.

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Looking for Meatless Options for Protein?

Check out these top Vegetarian Protein Sources.  By switching animal protein with organic vegetarian options just twice a week you will be on your way to a healthier heart.   

DAIRY

  • Egg Whites
  • Cottage Cheese
  • Cheddar Cheese
  • Mozzarella
  • Ricotta Cheese (low fat)
  • Parmesan
  • Gouda Cheese
  • Feta Cheese
  • Swiss Cheese
  • Low Fat Yogur

PULSES (LEGUMES)

  • Lentils
  • Peas
  • Blackeyed Peas
  • Kidney beans
  • Beans
  • Soybean

NUTS & SEEDS

  • Pine Nuts
  • Black Walnuts
  • Pumpkin seeds/Squash seeds
  • Roasted almonds
  • Cashew nuts
  • Hemp seeds
  • Sunflower seeds

CEREAL

  • Oats & Oat bran
  • Whole wheat spaghetti
  • Couscous
  • Bulgur
  • Rye bread
  • Whole wheat pita bread
  • Pita bread
  • Quinoa
  • Buckwheat

VEGETABLES

  • Spinach
  • Broccoli
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Sun-dried tomatoes
  • Asparagus
  • Cauliflower

Enjoy a healthy life like lifestyle in 2017.

Totally live and love life

Holiday Beef Tenderloin with Shallots and Herbs

 

At Total Wellness we believe in moderation not deprivation so during this wonderful holiday season treat yourself and family to this mouth-watering recipe.

Beef Tenderloin with Shallots and Herbs 

  • 3/4 pound shallots, halved lengthwise and peeled 
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil 
  • salt and pepper to taste 
  • 3 cups beef broth
  • 3/4 cup port wine 
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons tomato paste 
  • 2 pounds beef tenderloin roast, trimmed 
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme 
  • 3 slices bacon, diced 
  • 3 Tablespoons Butter
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 
  • 4 sprigs thyme, for garnish 

Directions

cooking stats

  • Prep 15 m
  • Cook 1 h 30 m
  • Ready In 1 h 45 m

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). In 9 inch pie pan, toss shallots with oil to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Roast until shallots are deep brown and very tender, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.

In a large saucepan, combine beef broth and port. Bring to a boil. Cook over high heat until the volume is reduced by half, about 30 minutes. Whisk in tomato paste. Set aside.

Pat beef dry; sprinkle with thyme, salt and pepper. In a large roasting pan, set over medium heat on the stove top, saute bacon until golden. Using a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels. Add beef to pan; brown on all sides over medium high heat, about 7 minutes.

Transfer pan to oven. Roast beef until meat thermometer inserted into center registers 125 degrees F (50 degrees C) for medium rare, about 25 minutes. Transfer beef to platter. Tent loosely with foil.

Spoon fat off top of pan drippings in roasting pan. Place pan over high heat on stove top. Add broth mixture, and bring to boil; stir to scrape up any browned bits. Transfer to a medium saucepan, and bring to simmer. Mix 1 1/2 tablespoon butter and flour in small bowl to form smooth paste; whisk into broth mixture, and simmer until sauce thickens. Whisk in remaining butter. Stir in roasted shallots and reserved bacon. Season with salt and pepper.

Cut beef into 1/2 inch thick slices. Spoon some sauce over, and garnish with watercress.

 Bon Appetit 

Is Poor Nutrition an Acceptable Form of Child Abuse

It was a beautiful sunrise that Sunday morning as I sat on the boat headed for Catalina Island.  We were only a few minutes from the shoreline when I noticed a young boy sitting a few rows ahead of me attempting to get the attention of his mother who appeared to be too engrossed with her cell phone to acknowledge him.  I felt my heart fill with compassion as I watched the boy squirm in his seat while he unsuccessfully attempted to get some reaction from his mother.  After a few more attempts the boy gave up and walked over to the side of the boat to peer off into the distance.  As he stood there I couldn't help but notice his extreme weight in proportion to his age and height.  As a Certified  Wellness and Nutrition Consultant I could easily see he was morbidly obese.  I found myself wondering if his mother was as negligent with his nutrition as she was with his need for attention.  Don't get me wrong, there are medical reasons, although rare, for some childhood obesity such as hormonal and or thyroid disease. However, 30% of children in the United States are considered overweight or obese due to over eating and little exercise.  I spent the next week haunted by the images of what his future held in store for him.  I knew from my studies that he was at high risk of developing chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, and possibly an early death. I asked myself... 

Is poor nutrition an acceptable form of child abuse?

Definition of Child Abuse:

Child abuse is any act or series of acts of commission or omission by a parent or other caregiver that results in harm, potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child.
— Webster Disctionary

The purpose of this blog is not to judge or condemn but rather to raise the awareness of the long term effects of making good choices for our children that are "healthy" vs "easy".   I believe as a society we all want what is best for our children.  And what is best is giving them the opportunity to be all they were created to be  and help them live a long healthy life. 

Special Note:  As rich as our country is we fall short when it comes to providing adequate education and ample healthy food supply to those who need it most. It is hard to believe that in 2016 we still have communities without grocery stores or farmer's markets.  In some areas the only food option is junk good provided by the local beer and wine store.   

To learn more about nutrition or how you can help communities in need of healthy food options please contact us. 

Asparagus n' Raspberry Black Rice Salad

  • Prep time: 10 mins
  • Cook time: 40 mins
  • Total time: 50 mins
  • Gluten-Free and Vegan
  • Recipe type: Entree
  • Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1½ cups uncooked black rice
  • 1 pint organic raspberries
  • 1 bunch of fresh asparagus, ends removed
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon zest
  • 2 scallions, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp. shredded coconut
  • ½ tsp. sea salt
  • ¼ tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 2 Tsp. extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

  1. Cook black rice according to package.
  2. Rinse raspberries; set aside. Cut asparagus into ½ inch pieces. In a large bowl, combine cooked rice, asparagus, lemon zest, scallions, coconut, sea salt and pepper; gently toss to combine. Place in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.
  3. Remove from fridge; fold in fresh raspberries; gently toss to combine. Drizzle with olive oil.
  4. Serve chilled.

Pear and Pomegranate Salad with Gorgonzola and Champagne Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • 8 cups baby spinach or romaine lettuce
  • 1 ripe pear, cut in half
  • 1/3 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 2 ounces Gorgonzola
  • Champagne vinaigrette, recipe follows
  • Fresh cracked pepper
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Champagne Vinaigrette:
  • 1/4 cup champagne vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

In a decorative bowl or platter, add the spinach or romaine. Cut the pear into fans, and then slice again on the diagonal, add the greens, crumble the Gorgonzola onto the salad and then drizzle with about half of the vinaigrette. Top with fresh cracked pepper and lightly drizzle the whole salad with the honey. Serve immediately.

Champagne Vinaigrette: In a small bowl or glass jar, add all the ingredients except the olive oil. Mix well, then slowly drizzle in the olive oil to combine. Refrigerate until ready to use.

Clean Kale and Brussel Sprout Salad - Can you say Yum

Ingredients

SERVINGS: 8–10

  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot
  • 1 small 
  • garlic clove, finely grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt plus more for seasoning
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 large bunches of Tuscan kale (about 1 1/2 lb. total), center stem discarded, leaves thinly sliced
  • 12 ounces brussels sprouts, trimmed, finely grated or shredded with a knife
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/3 cup almonds with skins, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup finely grated Pecorino 

Preparation

  • Combine lemon juice, Dijon mustard, shallot, garlic, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a pinch of pepper in a small bowl. Stir to blend; set aside to let flavors meld. Mix thinly sliced kale and shredded brussels sprouts in a large bowl.
  • Measure 1/2 cup oil into a cup. Spoon 1 Tbsp. oil from cup into a small skillet; heat oil over medium-high heat. Add almonds to skillet and stir frequently until golden brown in spots, about 2 minutes. Transfer nuts to a paper towel-lined plate. Sprinkle almonds lightly with salt.
  • Slowly whisk remaining olive oil in cup into lemon-juice mixture. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Do Ahead: Dressing, kale mixture, and toasted almonds can be prepared 8 hours ahead. Cover dressing and kale mixture separately and chill. Cover almonds and let stand at room temperature.
  • Add dressing and cheese to kale mixture; toss to coat. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Garnish with almonds.
  • Add your favorite meat if desiring extra protein 
  • Yum - enjoy

Super Refreshing Shaved Root Vegetable Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tablespoons hazelnuts, divided
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons hazelnut oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 medium red beet, peeled
  • 1 medium golden beet, peeled
  • 1 medium kohlrabi
  • 1 small yuca
  • 1 small turnip, peeled
  • 1 carrot, peeled
  • 2 radishes, trimmed
  • 1/4 cup (loosely packed) flat-leaf parsley

 

PREPARATION

  • Crush 2 tablespoons hazelnuts; place in a small bowl. Whisk in orange and lemon juice, vegetable oil, and hazelnut oil. Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Thinly slice beets, yuca, kohlrabi, turnip, carrot, and radishes using a mandoline or V-slicer. Place red beet slices in another small bowl and remaining vegetables and parsley in a medium bowl. Spoon 3 tablespoons vinaigrette over red beets; pour remaining vinaigrette over vegetables in medium bowl. Toss each to coat. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Arrange red beets on a platter; spoon over any vinaigrette from bowl. Top red beets with remaining vegetables. Drizzle salad with any remaining vinaigrette; garnish with remaining 2 tablespoons hazelnuts.

 

Per serving: 165 calories, 14 g fat, 10 g carbohydrate