5 Things Sabotaging Your Diet

Taking Control of Your Weight Once and For All

1. Medical issues

First of all, it is important to rule out any hidden reasons or medical issues that may be hindering your weight loss.  There are reasons, other than your food intake, that can interfere with your body's natural processing ability.  Such issues as; thyroid disease, autoimmune, gut problems, even toxin build up in your liver can sabotage your weight-loss goals. These issues need to be diagnosed and treated prior to starting any weight loss program. 

2. You use willpower instead of science to control your appetite

Willing yourself to starve your body of adequate nutrition/calories accomplish two things - ramps up your cravings and slows down your metabolism.  You may lose some weight but sadly this is not sustainable.  Eating plenty of the right foods actually stimulates weight-loss.  This is why it is important to know which foods are best for your body type, activity level, and lifestyle.  No one diet fits all regardless of what the marketing campaign says.  

3. You may not be eating enough fat

Yes, you read that right.  Science has proven that by increasing your intake of healthy fats you actually burn more fat. So all those fat-free packaged foods you have eaten may be to blame for some of your extra pounds.  Why? because most fat-free products (including low-fat dairy) is loaded up with extra sugar, and sugar is the enemy to weight loss and your overall health.   Beware of product packages that claim to be sugar-free.  Many of these products have added chemicals, artificial sugars, and sugar alcohol that can pack on the pounds. 

4. You try to do it on your own

Research shows that you have a 97% higher chance to succeed  "if " you have a buddy doing the weight loss program with you or you are working with a coach who keeps you focused and accountable. Solo dieting has only a 6 % success rate. If you don't have a buddy that wants to do the same program check online - there are plenty of free weight-loss groups you can join. 

5. You don't have a plan

This is the number one reason most weight loss programs fail.  Everyone who starts a new diet has great intentions of reaching their goal.  But regardless, if you're a newbie to nutrition or you are up to speed on the latest food science, if you don't have a plan you will fail.  No, I am not just talking about a meal plan but rather how you plan to juggle your busy life style and have time to prepare 3 meals plus a snack. It is common to master this for the first few days, maybe even weeks, but all too often it becomes too much and we fall back to the convenience of fast food or prepackaged foods only to gain the weight back. 

In order to help you avoid this all too common pitfall, I have created a guide to Healthy Meal Planning and Preparation.   This guide is packed with great ideas and tips to ensure you are equipped for success with any diet plan - and it is yours FREE. Simply Fill out the form below click submit and I will email you your copy. 

*Note:  Please put "Free Guide to Healthy Meal Plan and Prep in Subject line to ensure you are sent the correct eBook.

LEARN TO PLAN     PURCHASE     PREP     PREPARE

YOURS FREE

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If you have any questions regarding what diet is right for you - please don't hesitate to contact me at Cheri@totalwellnesscenter.net or call my office (310) 461-4107 

Stay Healthy 

The One Superfood That's Actually Worth The Money (According to Registered Dietitians)

We love playing around with superfoods in the kitchen, but it can get expensive. We asked registered dietitians to weigh in on their absolute favorite, so you can kick your collection off on the right note.

Article by Liz Moody

Turmeric

Photo: Stocksy

Photo: Stocksy

I think turmeric is worth it. I sprinkle it everywhere—in smoothies, teas, on roasted veggies and soups and marinades too. The mood benefits are insane (curcumin, the active ingredient, has been found as beneficial for mood disorders as Prozac), as are the anti-inflammatory, whole-body benefits. Black pepper also increases turmeric absorption, so i try to have a sprinkle of it wherever possible. Try to buy organic, and the whole root will be more nutritious than most shelf-stable powders. 

Carolyn Brown, R.D., founder of FoodTrainers

Cacao

I'm a big believer in sourcing the highest quality and unadulterated as well as sustainably and ethically sourced ingredients that provide the most bioavailable and absorbable nutrients, and this alone usually comes with a hefty price tag. It can be hard to factor quality today, though, with the explosion of superfood products and companies. If I'm being completely honest, though, the superfood that I use almost on a regular basis is cacao. There is nothing I crave more that provides me with the core minerals, mood-lifting, and energizing benefits, and for that result I will happily pay top dollar for both the fermented raw bean, or unprocessed raw bar that has been sweetened with unrefined sugars. 
 

Alle Weil, AADP, founder of Flora Ex Machina

Flaxseed

Photo: Stocksy

Photo: Stocksy

Flaxseeds are best absorbed when ground and provide many benefits to the diet. They are a great source of fiber and help things move along in the digestive tract. Flaxseeds are also are a great vegan source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are protective of the cardiovascular system by preventing and healing vascular damage related to inflammation. The anti-inflammatory properties of ground flaxseeds are not only limited to the cardiovascular system but assist the body in fighting free radicals, which lead to oxidative stress. Consuming anti-inflammatory foods helps to reduce the risk of certain cancers and diseases related to chronic inflammation. Flaxseeds are also a source of plant-based protein and are easily integrated into the diet. Throw them into a smoothie, top your oatmeal or yogurt with them, or add them to healthified baked goods or pancakes. 

Miranda Hammer, R.D., founder of Crunchy Radish

Spices

Spices! While spices aren't a solo superfood, collectively they are antioxidant superstars, and I try and incorporate them into everything. Remember, antioxidants are the "good guys" that scavenge dangerous free radicals that can otherwise cause damage on the cellular level. Plus they add a ton of delicious natural flavor to any given dish. If you can't take the heat, remember that spices don't have to actually be spicy. Think cinnamon, turmeric, basil, garlic powder, etc. I add cinnamon to my morning coffee, oatmeal, and smoothies. Garlic powder and turmeric are great in homemade soups, whole grain pastas, vegetable sides, and even omelets. The key is to make sure your spice cabinet is stocked and easily accessible, so you remember to use them!
 

Leah Silberman, R.D., founder of Tovita Nutrition

Collagen

I think purchasing superfoods is a wise investment into our health. When we place importance on consuming superfoods, naturally nutrient dense and full of health-boosting phytochemicals, we are really investing well into our health and prevention of diseases! If I could pick one in particular, I'd have to say collagen powder. It is incredibly rich in amino-acids that provide the body with many health-boosting benefits, and the powder dissolves so well into all kinds of foods it's virtually undetectable (unlike many other protein powders on the market).  
 

—Cristal Sczebel, CHN, founder of Nutritionist In The Kitch

Bone broth

Bone broth.jpg

Bone broth is truly a superfood, it has so many healing properties. While the bones are simmering, collagen, glycine, and glutamine all get released into the broth. The collagen in the broth helps your skin, hair, and nails look beautiful. It evens helps reduce cellulite and wrinkles! On top of that, the nutrients in bone broth help to heal your gut (which boosts your immune system since about 70 to 80 percent of your immune system lives in your gut!) and reduce inflammation.

Bone broth also contains a variety of different nutrients such as magnesium, phosphorus, and iron that are bioavailable to your body. You know that expensive supplement glucosamine and chondroitin that's recommended for joint health? Well, bone broth is loaded with it. That doesn't even complete the list of benefits—bone broth can also help with sleep, detoxification, metabolism, and anxiety.

Drink a cup daily or add it to your soups, stews, or veggie dishes. If you're going to purchase bone broth only, purchase homemade batches, from a co-op or a quality meat market. Even better, it's very simple to make yourself (and far more affordable!). 

Britni Thomas, R.D., of Nutritional Weight & Wellness

Chia seeds

A great source of omega-3 fatty acid ALA (the plant-based form), these tiny seeds are also packed with filling fiber and even provide some calcium and protein. They’re great for adding staying power to oatmeal, yogurt, and smoothies. Because they absorb so much water and easily form a gel, they’re also useful as an egg substitute or binding agent in baked goods or as a simple way to thicken sauces and beverages.
 

—Jessica Cording, R.D., founder of Jessica Cording Nutrition

Holiday Beef Tenderloin with Shallots and Herbs

 

At Total Wellness we believe in moderation not deprivation so during this wonderful holiday season treat yourself and family to this mouth-watering recipe.

Beef Tenderloin with Shallots and Herbs 

  • 3/4 pound shallots, halved lengthwise and peeled 
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil 
  • salt and pepper to taste 
  • 3 cups beef broth
  • 3/4 cup port wine 
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons tomato paste 
  • 2 pounds beef tenderloin roast, trimmed 
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme 
  • 3 slices bacon, diced 
  • 3 Tablespoons Butter
  • 1 tablespoon all-purpose flour 
  • 4 sprigs thyme, for garnish 

Directions

cooking stats

  • Prep 15 m
  • Cook 1 h 30 m
  • Ready In 1 h 45 m

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C). In 9 inch pie pan, toss shallots with oil to coat. Season with salt and pepper. Roast until shallots are deep brown and very tender, stirring occasionally, about 30 minutes.

In a large saucepan, combine beef broth and port. Bring to a boil. Cook over high heat until the volume is reduced by half, about 30 minutes. Whisk in tomato paste. Set aside.

Pat beef dry; sprinkle with thyme, salt and pepper. In a large roasting pan, set over medium heat on the stove top, saute bacon until golden. Using a slotted spoon, transfer bacon to paper towels. Add beef to pan; brown on all sides over medium high heat, about 7 minutes.

Transfer pan to oven. Roast beef until meat thermometer inserted into center registers 125 degrees F (50 degrees C) for medium rare, about 25 minutes. Transfer beef to platter. Tent loosely with foil.

Spoon fat off top of pan drippings in roasting pan. Place pan over high heat on stove top. Add broth mixture, and bring to boil; stir to scrape up any browned bits. Transfer to a medium saucepan, and bring to simmer. Mix 1 1/2 tablespoon butter and flour in small bowl to form smooth paste; whisk into broth mixture, and simmer until sauce thickens. Whisk in remaining butter. Stir in roasted shallots and reserved bacon. Season with salt and pepper.

Cut beef into 1/2 inch thick slices. Spoon some sauce over, and garnish with watercress.

 Bon Appetit 

Clean Kale and Brussel Sprout Salad - Can you say Yum

Ingredients

SERVINGS: 8–10

  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot
  • 1 small 
  • garlic clove, finely grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt plus more for seasoning
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 large bunches of Tuscan kale (about 1 1/2 lb. total), center stem discarded, leaves thinly sliced
  • 12 ounces brussels sprouts, trimmed, finely grated or shredded with a knife
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/3 cup almonds with skins, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup finely grated Pecorino 

Preparation

  • Combine lemon juice, Dijon mustard, shallot, garlic, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a pinch of pepper in a small bowl. Stir to blend; set aside to let flavors meld. Mix thinly sliced kale and shredded brussels sprouts in a large bowl.
  • Measure 1/2 cup oil into a cup. Spoon 1 Tbsp. oil from cup into a small skillet; heat oil over medium-high heat. Add almonds to skillet and stir frequently until golden brown in spots, about 2 minutes. Transfer nuts to a paper towel-lined plate. Sprinkle almonds lightly with salt.
  • Slowly whisk remaining olive oil in cup into lemon-juice mixture. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Do Ahead: Dressing, kale mixture, and toasted almonds can be prepared 8 hours ahead. Cover dressing and kale mixture separately and chill. Cover almonds and let stand at room temperature.
  • Add dressing and cheese to kale mixture; toss to coat. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Garnish with almonds.
  • Add your favorite meat if desiring extra protein 
  • Yum - enjoy

Super Refreshing Shaved Root Vegetable Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tablespoons hazelnuts, divided
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons hazelnut oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 medium red beet, peeled
  • 1 medium golden beet, peeled
  • 1 medium kohlrabi
  • 1 small yuca
  • 1 small turnip, peeled
  • 1 carrot, peeled
  • 2 radishes, trimmed
  • 1/4 cup (loosely packed) flat-leaf parsley

 

PREPARATION

  • Crush 2 tablespoons hazelnuts; place in a small bowl. Whisk in orange and lemon juice, vegetable oil, and hazelnut oil. Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Thinly slice beets, yuca, kohlrabi, turnip, carrot, and radishes using a mandoline or V-slicer. Place red beet slices in another small bowl and remaining vegetables and parsley in a medium bowl. Spoon 3 tablespoons vinaigrette over red beets; pour remaining vinaigrette over vegetables in medium bowl. Toss each to coat. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Arrange red beets on a platter; spoon over any vinaigrette from bowl. Top red beets with remaining vegetables. Drizzle salad with any remaining vinaigrette; garnish with remaining 2 tablespoons hazelnuts.

 

Per serving: 165 calories, 14 g fat, 10 g carbohydrate

Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Tangerine-Rosemary Vinaigrette

Refreshing summer salad for those hot August nights! Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes (about 4 cups)
  • 4  tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 teaspoons roughly chopped fresh rosemary
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 tangerines
  • 6 cups fresh spinach, loosely packed
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries

 

Directions

 

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  • Toss the squash with 2 tablespoons olive oil on a baking sheet and spread in an even layer. Season with 2 teaspoons rosemary, and salt and pepper. Roast - stirring once halfway through, until the squash is just tender and golden, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool until just warm, about 15 minutes.
  • While the squash is roasting, peel 3 tangerines and slice them crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick rounds, removing any seeds. Juice the remaining tangerine and whisk the juice together with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and remaining 1 teaspoon rosemary. Season the Dressing with salt and pepper.
  • Combine the warm squash, the spinach, tangerine slices and cranberries with the dressing and toss gently to coat. Divide among salad plates.

KALE SALAD WITH GRILLED EGGPLANT, WHITE BEANS AND FRESH FIGS [VEGAN]

Another Amazing Vegan Salad Packed with Protein SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 2 medium-large cloves garlic

  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika

  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

  • Pinch sea salt

  • 1 Japanese eggplant, about 10 inches long, ends removed, and cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch thick slices

  • 1/2 of a large orange or yellow bell pepper, cut into 1/3-inch or slightly wider pieces

  • Approximately 1/4 cup red onion, cut into 1/4-inch slices

  • 1-15 ounce can white beans, rinsed and drained

  • 2 generous cups lightly packed fresh kale, stems removed, and torn into bite size pieces (if the farmer’s market doesn’t have any, I purchase the pre-washed, pre-torn kale in a bag and remove any remaining thick stems)

  • 5 ounces plain or garlic-flavored hummus (half of a typical carton–I use Sabra brand Roasted Garlic)

  • Approximately 1/3 cup olive oil

  • 8 small-medium leaves fresh basil chiffonade (stacked, tightly rolled, and sliced into very narrow slivers), or finely chopped

  • 8 small-medium leaves fresh sage chiffonade (stacked, tightly rolled, and sliced into very narrow slivers), or finely chopped

  • Pinch sea salt and freshly ground black pepper or to taste

  • 8 fresh figs, stemmed, and sliced in half vertically

  • 1/4 cup roasted and lightly salted sunflower seeds

  • Optional garnish: sprigs of fresh basil

  1. In a medium-large bowl, whisk together the 1/4 cup olive oil, garlic, smoked paprika, turmeric, and pinch of sea salt. Add the eggplant, bell pepper, and red onion and toss to coat.

  2. Let marinate for a few minutes.

  3. Then, heat a seasoned grill pan over medium high and grill the veggies in batches for 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until nice grill marks develop.

  4. Return them to the bowl they were marinating in.

  5. While the veggies grill, whisk together the hummus, 1/3 cup olive oil, fresh herbs, and salt and pepper to taste.

  6. Add the white beans and kale to the veggies, pour the dressing over and toss to coat.

  7. Arrange the salad on a serving platter or individual plates, nestle the fig halves, flesh side up, over the top, sprinkle with sunflower seeds and garnish, if desired, with fresh basil springs.

  8. Serve immediately.