14 Healthy Recipes to "Make Your Lunch Count"

Easy, Delicious Recipes to help you celebrate   "National Make Your Lunch Count Day"  Free Download

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But why wait until April 13th,  when we can start today?  Between breakfast, widely branded as the day’s “most important” meal, and dinner, the meal we spend all day waiting for, lays a conspicuous meal that doesn’t get the recognition it deserves: lunch. It’s sometimes seen as a tide-me-over between breakfast and dinner, and will often be forgotten altogether if a day’s workload proves too large to allow for a break. So, on April 13, let’s take a moment to memorialize lunch. And not just memorialize it, but really make it count! Here’s a hearty, midday toast to National Make Lunch Count Day.

Why We Love National Make Lunch Count Day

  •  It's a window to the world

Lunch is the meal most often eaten away from home, and as such, we're usually around a different crowd of people in a different place than for our other meals. One way we can really make our lunches count is by finding ways to enjoy it with those around us. It's the perfect time to arrange a short, midday meet-up with an old friend, or to get to know a new one a little better.

  •  When breakfast gets in the way, lunch saves the day

We've all had mornings where we're just too rushed to put some food into our stomachs before taking off. If it weren't for our lunch breaks, there's no way we'd make it through those days. Lunch can serve as a much-needed afternoon pick-me-up when there's just no time for breakfast.

  •  It breaks up the day

You'd have a hard time finding a worker who doesn't look forward to their lunch break! After breaking out of those morning blues, lunch can serve as a much-needed hiatus from the day that'll help carry us through to the end.

How to Celebrate National Make Lunch Count Day

1. Arrange a group lunch

We've all got to eat lunch — why not do it together? National Make Lunch Count Day is the perfect excuse to arrange that group lunch that your coworkers have been talking about for lunch.

2. Buy a lunch for someone who can't

While many of us can afford that noontime sandwich, there are a lot of us who can't. If you're in a position to help, consider buying a lunch for someone near you who might otherwise struggle to pay for it themselves.

3. Plan your next week's lunches

Lunch often becomes an afterthought once you're nose-deep in a pile of work. Consider planning ahead to make sure you'll always have something nutritious to take you from breakfast to dinner! To do this, we have created a healthy lunch recipe book packed with easy recipes for the busy lifestyle we all seem to live.

So, regardless of it being "Make Your Lunch Count Day or Week", the key is to make your health count everyday.   In addition to downloading your FREE recipe book, also sign up for our Newsletter and receive tips on how to acheive health in your relationships, emotionally, physically,  spiritually, and  even professionally. 

We are excited to be a part of your life transformation.  As always, your feedback is greatly appreciated. 

 

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This Report Will Make You Rethink the Reson You Crave Food

50 Suggestions to help you stop the craving cycle.  

 

Free Guide available at the end of this blog.  Take advantage of this offer and take control of your life.

Food cravings aren’t as simple as some may believe. People are often told to use willpower or simply stop eating certain foods. However, cravings are often rooted in psychological, physical, or emotional needs. The first step to curbing your cravings is to figuring out what causes them and then why you can’t control the urges.

Outside factors such as manufacturers and advertising media have an effect on cravings. Sugar, salt, and the carbohydrates in processed foods make you want more. However, these aren’t the only reasons cravings can grab you when you least expect them.

They can be the result of a lack in nutrients or the environment we live in. It could be stress, emotions or conditioning that makes us crave different foods.

Cravings can be harmful in several ways. Some of the more common problems include weight gain, which can lead to high blood pressure, stroke, or heart disease. Another harmful outcome of cravings is addiction. Foods like sugar, and anything that breaks down into sugar such as alcohol, can be addictive and very difficult to be without.

There is good news though. Cravings can be controlled with hard work and changes in your diet and habits.

For instance, if you normally eat lots of processed foods, begin cooking your own meals to help control the amount of sugar, salt, and fats. Take advantage of fresh herbs and spices to add more flavor to your meals. Filling up on savory healthy meals every three hours or so will help curb your cravings.

Control your environment and the people you associate with as well. If you have trouble saying no in social situations, you may need to find new activities.

In the end, curbing your cravings can help you lead a healthy lifestyle.

Interested in learning more about controlling your cravings?  Click the link below and I will send you your free guide with over 50 ways to control your cravings.  If you have additional questions about nutrition please feel free to contact meat (310) 416-4107 or Cheri@totalwellnesscenter.net

 

For your FREE Guide on how to stop cravings fill out the form below and I will send it to the email address of your choice.   Congratulations on taking control of your cravings and your life.* NOTE:  Please insert Curb Cravings into the Subject box so you receive the right materials

 

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Summer is Here

Lose 5, 10, 15 Pounds .....Fast

Learn the secret of losing those last few pounds or simply how to kick start your journey to a healthier you.

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And so much more.

 

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Have a great Summer

The One Superfood That's Actually Worth The Money (According to Registered Dietitians)

We love playing around with superfoods in the kitchen, but it can get expensive. We asked registered dietitians to weigh in on their absolute favorite, so you can kick your collection off on the right note.

Article by Liz Moody

Turmeric

Photo: Stocksy

Photo: Stocksy

I think turmeric is worth it. I sprinkle it everywhere—in smoothies, teas, on roasted veggies and soups and marinades too. The mood benefits are insane (curcumin, the active ingredient, has been found as beneficial for mood disorders as Prozac), as are the anti-inflammatory, whole-body benefits. Black pepper also increases turmeric absorption, so i try to have a sprinkle of it wherever possible. Try to buy organic, and the whole root will be more nutritious than most shelf-stable powders. 

Carolyn Brown, R.D., founder of FoodTrainers

Cacao

I'm a big believer in sourcing the highest quality and unadulterated as well as sustainably and ethically sourced ingredients that provide the most bioavailable and absorbable nutrients, and this alone usually comes with a hefty price tag. It can be hard to factor quality today, though, with the explosion of superfood products and companies. If I'm being completely honest, though, the superfood that I use almost on a regular basis is cacao. There is nothing I crave more that provides me with the core minerals, mood-lifting, and energizing benefits, and for that result I will happily pay top dollar for both the fermented raw bean, or unprocessed raw bar that has been sweetened with unrefined sugars. 
 

Alle Weil, AADP, founder of Flora Ex Machina

Flaxseed

Photo: Stocksy

Photo: Stocksy

Flaxseeds are best absorbed when ground and provide many benefits to the diet. They are a great source of fiber and help things move along in the digestive tract. Flaxseeds are also are a great vegan source of omega-3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids are protective of the cardiovascular system by preventing and healing vascular damage related to inflammation. The anti-inflammatory properties of ground flaxseeds are not only limited to the cardiovascular system but assist the body in fighting free radicals, which lead to oxidative stress. Consuming anti-inflammatory foods helps to reduce the risk of certain cancers and diseases related to chronic inflammation. Flaxseeds are also a source of plant-based protein and are easily integrated into the diet. Throw them into a smoothie, top your oatmeal or yogurt with them, or add them to healthified baked goods or pancakes. 

Miranda Hammer, R.D., founder of Crunchy Radish

Spices

Spices! While spices aren't a solo superfood, collectively they are antioxidant superstars, and I try and incorporate them into everything. Remember, antioxidants are the "good guys" that scavenge dangerous free radicals that can otherwise cause damage on the cellular level. Plus they add a ton of delicious natural flavor to any given dish. If you can't take the heat, remember that spices don't have to actually be spicy. Think cinnamon, turmeric, basil, garlic powder, etc. I add cinnamon to my morning coffee, oatmeal, and smoothies. Garlic powder and turmeric are great in homemade soups, whole grain pastas, vegetable sides, and even omelets. The key is to make sure your spice cabinet is stocked and easily accessible, so you remember to use them!
 

Leah Silberman, R.D., founder of Tovita Nutrition

Collagen

I think purchasing superfoods is a wise investment into our health. When we place importance on consuming superfoods, naturally nutrient dense and full of health-boosting phytochemicals, we are really investing well into our health and prevention of diseases! If I could pick one in particular, I'd have to say collagen powder. It is incredibly rich in amino-acids that provide the body with many health-boosting benefits, and the powder dissolves so well into all kinds of foods it's virtually undetectable (unlike many other protein powders on the market).  
 

—Cristal Sczebel, CHN, founder of Nutritionist In The Kitch

Bone broth

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Bone broth is truly a superfood, it has so many healing properties. While the bones are simmering, collagen, glycine, and glutamine all get released into the broth. The collagen in the broth helps your skin, hair, and nails look beautiful. It evens helps reduce cellulite and wrinkles! On top of that, the nutrients in bone broth help to heal your gut (which boosts your immune system since about 70 to 80 percent of your immune system lives in your gut!) and reduce inflammation.

Bone broth also contains a variety of different nutrients such as magnesium, phosphorus, and iron that are bioavailable to your body. You know that expensive supplement glucosamine and chondroitin that's recommended for joint health? Well, bone broth is loaded with it. That doesn't even complete the list of benefits—bone broth can also help with sleep, detoxification, metabolism, and anxiety.

Drink a cup daily or add it to your soups, stews, or veggie dishes. If you're going to purchase bone broth only, purchase homemade batches, from a co-op or a quality meat market. Even better, it's very simple to make yourself (and far more affordable!). 

Britni Thomas, R.D., of Nutritional Weight & Wellness

Chia seeds

A great source of omega-3 fatty acid ALA (the plant-based form), these tiny seeds are also packed with filling fiber and even provide some calcium and protein. They’re great for adding staying power to oatmeal, yogurt, and smoothies. Because they absorb so much water and easily form a gel, they’re also useful as an egg substitute or binding agent in baked goods or as a simple way to thicken sauces and beverages.
 

—Jessica Cording, R.D., founder of Jessica Cording Nutrition

Clean Eating Course 101

From diet books and recipes to your Instagram feed, the clean eating trend seems to be everywhere lately. Read on to find out what it's all about and if it's really worth trying.

Defining Clean Eating

Maybe a new raw cafe has sprung up in your neighborhood, or you read about Katy Perry and Gwyneth Paltrow being fans. Either way, eating "clean" is gaining traction — but what does it actually mean, and how is it good for the body?

Clean eating is a deceptively simple concept. Rather than revolving around the idea of ingesting more or less of specific things (for instance, fewer calories or more protein), the idea is more about being mindful of the food's pathway between its origin and your plate. At its simplest, clean eating is about eating whole foods, or "real" foods — those that are un- or minimally processed, refined, and handled, making them as close to their natural form as possible. However, modern food production has become so sophisticated that simply eating whole foods can be a challenging proposition these days.

What Counts as Processed Foods?

First, let's start with the definition of processed food. "Processing" includes:

Additions of any kind — everything from salt, sugar, and fat to aid flavor and mouthfeel, to preservatives that keep food from spoiling too quickly, to the vitamins enriching everything from beverages to breakfast cereal. 
Changing the form of the natural food — for instance, removing the bran and germ from whole grains to create refined bread, mashing apples into applesauce, or stir-frying veggies.
Foods with components manufactured in a lab. (You probably don't need clarification on this one, but if the ingredient list has stuff you can't recognize or pronounce, that's a pretty solid indication that it's not natural).

In that light, processed food includes everything from a hot dog (where do we even begin?) to jarred organic pasta sauce and instant oatmeal. And yes, changing the form of natural food includes cooking as well, so even your steamed broccoli is technically processed, albeit minimally.

So why, exactly, is processing so bad — especially if it's something as simple as adding heat?

Why Is Processed Food Bad?

In two words: It's not. Or rather, not categorically.

"Processing is not always bad," says Jessica Fanzo, assistant professor of nutrition at Columbia University. "Often processing removes toxins or bacteria, or allows for us to eat certain types of foods in off-season due to freezing or canning." (Pasteurized milk, anyone?) Processing "can also include altering the consistency or taste of food to make it more appealing," Fanzo adds. So that delicious post-workout kale-celery-spinach- banana smoothie  you had? Enjoy that virtuous feeling knowing that you were likely able to down that giant amount of greens because your treat was somewhat processed.

Still, even though pasteurized milk, kale smoothies, and instant oatmeal are all processed, that doesn't make them on par with doughnuts and Diet Coke.

"The key is to avoid foods that are 'ultra-processed,'" says Fanzo — basically, anything food-product-like or ready-to-heat."

The Problem with Ultra-Processed Foods

As you can probably guess, the health problems associated with ultra-processed food are numerous. Foods with genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been linked to cancer and infertility; highly processed foods are stripped of nutrients needed for overall health; and heavily modified food tends to have additives that overstimulate the production of dopamine, the "pleasure" neurotransmitter, perpetuating a negative cycle of constant junk food cravings.

However, there's added reason for pause when reaching for the Pop-Tart.

In a 2011 article published in the Journal of the World Public Health Nutrition Association, Carlos Monteiro, professor at the Department of Nutrition of the School of Public Health at the University of Sao Paulo, argues that having ultra-processed foods touted in a way that makes it seem good for you — less sodium! no trans fats! vitamin-enriched! — actually causes more damage to our collective understanding of healthy eating than we may realize. Considering the increasing abundance of "healthfully" enhanced products in the grocery aisles (or perhaps even your refrigerator), Monteiro may be on to something.

The Perks of Clean Eating

Thanks to extensive research that has linked eating whole foods with good health, "we do know that largely plant-based diets are healthy," says Fanzo. Multiple studies have shown that diets heavy on fruits and vegetables can curb or prevent certain life-threatening conditions and diseases, such as high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Plus, there's research linking diets high in fruits and veggies to healthy weight management and glowing skin and hair — as if you needed more motivation.

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How to Eat Clean

Unprocessed foods include:

  • Fresh fruits and vegetables
  • Dried legumes
  • Nuts
  • Farm-fresh eggs

Minimally processed foods include:

  • Unrefined grains, like whole wheat bread and pasta, popcorn, steel-cut oatmeal, quinoa, and brown rice
  • Frozen fruits and vegetables
  • Unprocessed meat; wild over pastured, pastured over grain-fed
  • Hormone-free dairy
  • Oils

Pesticide-free organic food is preferable to avoid consuming added hormones or chemicals. It's also important to note that eating clean doesn't give you free reign to eat endless quantities. They may be healthy, but they still have calories!

"You always have to think about portion size," says Marissa Lippert, RD, owner of Nourish Kitchen + Table, a seasonally influenced cafe in New York City. "I always encourage people to think of their plate in terms of fifths: three-fifths should be fruits and vegetables, one-fifth should be protein, and one-fifth healthy carbs."

How to Shop Clean

Realistically, eating clean doesn't mean you need to eat everything raw and straight from the ground. It means choosing minimally processed foods with few ingredients on the label, if it has a label at all.

If you're shopping around the perimeter of the grocery store, that's always a good start, says Lippert.

When perusing the main aisles for packaged foods, ask yourself: Where did this food or its ingredients come from? How much has it been processed or handled? The ingredient label should be short, and all ingredients should be recognizable. Scan for easy-to-avoid additives like artificial coloring and flavors.

How to Cook Clean

Cooking does alter your food, but it isn't necessarily a bad thing.

"While it's true that some nutrients are lost during cooking, like vitamin C, other nutrients are increased when foods are cooked, like lycopene, so it's best to eat a wide variety of foods, in both their raw and cooked forms," says EA Stewart, RD, who blogs at The Spicy RD.

When cooking food, "the focus should be on maintaining the integrity of what you are consuming and avoiding high-fat cooking methods such as deep-frying or stewing in animal or vegetable fats," says Miranda Hammer, a New York City registered dietitian and author of food blog The Crunchy Radish.

When cooking, opt for flash-cook methods such as stir-frying and ones without additives like steaming. For fruits and veggies, raw is best, but steaming is a close second in terms of preserving nutritional value and keeping the food's natural integrity.

The Paleo Lifestyle

The Paleo diet, which promotes eating only foods as our ancestors did during the Paleolithic era, is similar to a clean diet in that they both advocate whole foods. However, the Paleo diet limits food to pre-Industrial Revolution, meaning it prohibits all grains (not just refined ones), legumes, and dairy products, which clean eating does not.

While there are many personal testimonials that Paleo works, some experts are skeptical. "I don't think we need to all eat meat," says Fanzo. Moreover, "banishing major food groups makes no sense from a physiologic point of view. It sets a person up for failure and rebounding weight."

The Whole 9 Lifestyle and Whole 30

Founded in 2009 by a couple in Texas, the Whole 9 lifestyle is based on nine principles that contribute to a balanced life. Nutrition is one of the core factors, and the lifestyle's eating recommendation is one of whole foods, like meat, eggs, vegetables, fruit, healthy oils, nuts, and seeds.

If you're new to Whole 9, it kicks off with a 30-day detox called Whole 30, in which whole foods are eaten but all alcohol, sugar, grains, legumes, and dairy are eliminated to "push the reset button with your metabolism, systemic inflammation, and the downstream effects of the food choices you've been making."

Experts like Fanzo see the elimination of entire food groups (as with the Paleo diet) as problematic. For some people, though, a short cut-off may help them get in the right "healthy eating" mind-set.

"If a brief, up to one week abstinence from certain foods — not all foods! — helps people get in the right mind-set to eat healthier, and they don't have any medical conditions, then I think this is fine from a health and nutrition standpoint," says Stewart. "However I don't think it is necessary, and in many cases it sets people up for an 'all or nothing' approach to their diets."

To receive the latest information on "Clean Eating" sign up for our newsletter.  We love to hear from you so feel free to drop us a line in the comment box below.

Be Healthy,

Total Wellness Resource Center 

Original article was published in Fitness Magazine . Author : Joselyn Voo

Is Poor Nutrition an Acceptable Form of Child Abuse

It was a beautiful sunrise that Sunday morning as I sat on the boat headed for Catalina Island.  We were only a few minutes from the shoreline when I noticed a young boy sitting a few rows ahead of me attempting to get the attention of his mother who appeared to be too engrossed with her cell phone to acknowledge him.  I felt my heart fill with compassion as I watched the boy squirm in his seat while he unsuccessfully attempted to get some reaction from his mother.  After a few more attempts the boy gave up and walked over to the side of the boat to peer off into the distance.  As he stood there I couldn't help but notice his extreme weight in proportion to his age and height.  As a Certified  Wellness and Nutrition Consultant I could easily see he was morbidly obese.  I found myself wondering if his mother was as negligent with his nutrition as she was with his need for attention.  Don't get me wrong, there are medical reasons, although rare, for some childhood obesity such as hormonal and or thyroid disease. However, 30% of children in the United States are considered overweight or obese due to over eating and little exercise.  I spent the next week haunted by the images of what his future held in store for him.  I knew from my studies that he was at high risk of developing chronic illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, and possibly an early death. I asked myself... 

Is poor nutrition an acceptable form of child abuse?

Definition of Child Abuse:

Child abuse is any act or series of acts of commission or omission by a parent or other caregiver that results in harm, potential for harm, or threat of harm to a child.
— Webster Disctionary

The purpose of this blog is not to judge or condemn but rather to raise the awareness of the long term effects of making good choices for our children that are "healthy" vs "easy".   I believe as a society we all want what is best for our children.  And what is best is giving them the opportunity to be all they were created to be  and help them live a long healthy life. 

Special Note:  As rich as our country is we fall short when it comes to providing adequate education and ample healthy food supply to those who need it most. It is hard to believe that in 2016 we still have communities without grocery stores or farmer's markets.  In some areas the only food option is junk good provided by the local beer and wine store.   

To learn more about nutrition or how you can help communities in need of healthy food options please contact us. 

Asparagus n' Raspberry Black Rice Salad

  • Prep time: 10 mins
  • Cook time: 40 mins
  • Total time: 50 mins
  • Gluten-Free and Vegan
  • Recipe type: Entree
  • Serves: 4

Ingredients

  • 1½ cups uncooked black rice
  • 1 pint organic raspberries
  • 1 bunch of fresh asparagus, ends removed
  • 1 Tbsp. fresh lemon zest
  • 2 scallions, finely chopped
  • 2 Tbsp. shredded coconut
  • ½ tsp. sea salt
  • ¼ tsp. freshly ground pepper
  • 2 Tsp. extra virgin olive oil

Instructions

  1. Cook black rice according to package.
  2. Rinse raspberries; set aside. Cut asparagus into ½ inch pieces. In a large bowl, combine cooked rice, asparagus, lemon zest, scallions, coconut, sea salt and pepper; gently toss to combine. Place in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.
  3. Remove from fridge; fold in fresh raspberries; gently toss to combine. Drizzle with olive oil.
  4. Serve chilled.

Pear and Pomegranate Salad with Gorgonzola and Champagne Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • 8 cups baby spinach or romaine lettuce
  • 1 ripe pear, cut in half
  • 1/3 cup pomegranate seeds
  • 2 ounces Gorgonzola
  • Champagne vinaigrette, recipe follows
  • Fresh cracked pepper
  • 1 tablespoon honey
  • Champagne Vinaigrette:
  • 1/4 cup champagne vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard
  • 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly cracked black pepper
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil

Directions

In a decorative bowl or platter, add the spinach or romaine. Cut the pear into fans, and then slice again on the diagonal, add the greens, crumble the Gorgonzola onto the salad and then drizzle with about half of the vinaigrette. Top with fresh cracked pepper and lightly drizzle the whole salad with the honey. Serve immediately.

Champagne Vinaigrette: In a small bowl or glass jar, add all the ingredients except the olive oil. Mix well, then slowly drizzle in the olive oil to combine. Refrigerate until ready to use.

Clean Kale and Brussel Sprout Salad - Can you say Yum

Ingredients

SERVINGS: 8–10

  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 tablespoon minced shallot
  • 1 small 
  • garlic clove, finely grated
  • 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt plus more for seasoning
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 large bunches of Tuscan kale (about 1 1/2 lb. total), center stem discarded, leaves thinly sliced
  • 12 ounces brussels sprouts, trimmed, finely grated or shredded with a knife
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 1/3 cup almonds with skins, coarsely chopped
  • 1 cup finely grated Pecorino 

Preparation

  • Combine lemon juice, Dijon mustard, shallot, garlic, 1/2 tsp. salt, and a pinch of pepper in a small bowl. Stir to blend; set aside to let flavors meld. Mix thinly sliced kale and shredded brussels sprouts in a large bowl.
  • Measure 1/2 cup oil into a cup. Spoon 1 Tbsp. oil from cup into a small skillet; heat oil over medium-high heat. Add almonds to skillet and stir frequently until golden brown in spots, about 2 minutes. Transfer nuts to a paper towel-lined plate. Sprinkle almonds lightly with salt.
  • Slowly whisk remaining olive oil in cup into lemon-juice mixture. Season dressing to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Do Ahead: Dressing, kale mixture, and toasted almonds can be prepared 8 hours ahead. Cover dressing and kale mixture separately and chill. Cover almonds and let stand at room temperature.
  • Add dressing and cheese to kale mixture; toss to coat. Season lightly with salt and pepper. Garnish with almonds.
  • Add your favorite meat if desiring extra protein 
  • Yum - enjoy

Super Refreshing Shaved Root Vegetable Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 4 tablespoons hazelnuts, divided
  • 1/4 cup fresh orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 teaspoons hazelnut oil
  • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 medium red beet, peeled
  • 1 medium golden beet, peeled
  • 1 medium kohlrabi
  • 1 small yuca
  • 1 small turnip, peeled
  • 1 carrot, peeled
  • 2 radishes, trimmed
  • 1/4 cup (loosely packed) flat-leaf parsley

 

PREPARATION

  • Crush 2 tablespoons hazelnuts; place in a small bowl. Whisk in orange and lemon juice, vegetable oil, and hazelnut oil. Season vinaigrette to taste with salt and pepper.
  • Thinly slice beets, yuca, kohlrabi, turnip, carrot, and radishes using a mandoline or V-slicer. Place red beet slices in another small bowl and remaining vegetables and parsley in a medium bowl. Spoon 3 tablespoons vinaigrette over red beets; pour remaining vinaigrette over vegetables in medium bowl. Toss each to coat. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Arrange red beets on a platter; spoon over any vinaigrette from bowl. Top red beets with remaining vegetables. Drizzle salad with any remaining vinaigrette; garnish with remaining 2 tablespoons hazelnuts.

 

Per serving: 165 calories, 14 g fat, 10 g carbohydrate

Roasted Butternut Squash Salad With Tangerine-Rosemary Vinaigrette

Refreshing summer salad for those hot August nights! Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds butternut squash, peeled, seeded and cut into 1-inch cubes (about 4 cups)
  • 4  tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 3 teaspoons roughly chopped fresh rosemary
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper
  • 4 tangerines
  • 6 cups fresh spinach, loosely packed
  • 1/4 cup dried cranberries

 

Directions

 

  • Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F.
  • Toss the squash with 2 tablespoons olive oil on a baking sheet and spread in an even layer. Season with 2 teaspoons rosemary, and salt and pepper. Roast - stirring once halfway through, until the squash is just tender and golden, about 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool until just warm, about 15 minutes.
  • While the squash is roasting, peel 3 tangerines and slice them crosswise into 1/2-inch-thick rounds, removing any seeds. Juice the remaining tangerine and whisk the juice together with the remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and remaining 1 teaspoon rosemary. Season the Dressing with salt and pepper.
  • Combine the warm squash, the spinach, tangerine slices and cranberries with the dressing and toss gently to coat. Divide among salad plates.

Shaved Kohlrabi with Apple and Hazelnuts

If you have never had Kohlrabi you are in for a real treat.  I first discovered this root at a farmers market in Redondo Beach, CA and it quickly became my favorite veggie. It comes is purple and white - try mixing colors to make a beautiful presentation of this dish. 

Shaved Kohlrabi with Apple and Hazelnuts

Ingredients

SERVINGS: 4 

  • ½ cup blanched hazelnuts
  • 2 medium kohlrabi (about 2 lb. total), peeled, thinly sliced on a mandolin  
  • 1 tart apple (such as Pink Lady or Crispin), peeled, cored, thinly sliced on a mandoline
  • ½ teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
  • 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar or white balsamic vinegar
  • Kosher salt
  • ½ cup torn fresh mint leaves, plus more for serving
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 oz. Pecorino di Fossa or Parmesan, shaved (about ¼ cup)

Preparation

  • Preheat oven to 350°. Toast hazelnuts on a rimmed baking sheet, tossing occasionally, until golden brown, 10–12 minutes. Let cool, then coarsely chop.
  • Toss kohlrabi, apple, lemon zest, lemon juice, and vinegar in a medium bowl; season with salt. Add ½ cup mint and gently toss to just combine.
  • Toss toasted hazelnuts and oil in a small bowl to coat; season with salt.
  • Divide kohlrabi salad among plates and top with seasoned hazelnuts, Pecorino, and more mint.
  • Do Ahead: Hazelnuts can be toasted 1 day ahead; store airtight at room temperature.

CRISPY EGGPLANT CAPRESE STACKS

This is one of those recipes that, to me, is just inexplicably good. Simple, quality ingredients combine to make something that is so tasty it elicits an eye roll… at least in this house that’s the measure of deliciousness!

Fresh basil, melt-in-your-mouth mozzarella and a juicy tomato combine with the crispy eggplant to make for an amazing flavor experience. Drizzled with a delicious mixture of good quality olive oil and balsamic vinegar, you’d think you were transported to the Mediterranean with one mouthful!

YIELD: Makes 2

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 ripe tomatoes
  • 1 8 oz. ball fresh mozzarella*
  • 6-8 leaves fresh basil
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil, for skillet
  • 6 (1/4-inch-thick) slices eggplant
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1/2 cup panko breadcrumbs
  • For dressing*:
  • 2 Tablespoons good-quality olive oil
  • 1 Tablespoon good-quality balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and freshly ground pepper, to taste

DIRECTIONS:

  1. Slice tomatoes and mozzarella about 1/4-inch thick. Rinse and pat basil dry (you can keep it whole or tear into smaller pieces). Set aside.
  2. Preheat a large skillet to medium heat and add 1 Tbsp. olive oil. Prepare eggplant slices by coating lightly in flour, then egg (shaking off excess), and then panko, all in separate dishes. Once skillet is hot, add eggplant slices and fry, in batches, about 3 minutes per side until golden brown. Remove to a paper-towel lined plate.
  3. Combine dressing ingredients in a small bowl and whisk until well-combined. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.
  4. On serving plates, build stacks by alternating tomato, mozzarella, eggplant, and basil. Repeat until you have 2 equal-sized stacks. Drizzle with dressing.
  5. Enjoy!

Amazing Arugula Salad with Turkey Bacon and Poached Egg

This is my favorite Breakfast Salad that I ask for when I go out to breakfast. Sometimes the waiter looks at me funny but it's simply out of this world! 

arugulasalad.jpeg
  • 8 ounces turkey bacon, cut into lardons
  • 2 large shallots, sliced
  • 8 ounces arugula
  • 4 large eggs
  • 1/4 cup red wine vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  • kosher salt and black pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

1. Bring a medium pot of water to a boil for the eggs.

2. In a medium (10-inch) skillet over high heat, heat the bacon with 1/4 cup water. Once the water is evaporated, lower the heat to medium-low and continue cooking the bacon until it’s beginning to crisp.

3. Add the shallot to the bacon and cook until it’s wilted and translucent and the bacon is cooked, about 3 minutes more.

4. Put the arugula in a salad bowl and spoon the bacon-shallot mixture over the greens (you may want to leave some fat behind, depending on how much there is in the pan and the quantity of greens). Toss together to evenly coat.

5. Meanwhile, crack the eggs into individual small bowls or ramekins. Lower the water to a simmer and carefully add the eggs one at a time. Cook gently until the white is completely set but the yolk is still runny, 3-4 minutes.

6. Sprinkle the arugula with the vinegar (start with less and add to taste). Season with salt and pepper and divide amongst plates or bowls. Top with poached eggs and serve immediately.

Roasted Beet Salad

INGREDIENTS

  • 2 large whole beets
  • 1 ball of fresh Mozzarella cheese
  • A few slices of cucumber
  • Toasted hazelnuts for garnish
  • A few tablespoons of vinaigrette

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Roast whole beets on a sheet pan at 350 degrees for about an hour, until they are fork tender. Let them cool.
  2. Slice the beets into slices that are a little thicker than ¼ inch thick. Using heart shaped cookie cutters, cut out some hearts out of the beet slices.Place on a serving plate.
  3. Take fresh Mozzarella (if you're doing Whole30 eating, use slices of jicama.) and cut it into slices that are little thicker than ¼ inch thick. Cut out smaller heart shapes. Press the Mozzarella hearts into the beet juices that are left on your cutting board, turning the slices slightly pink. Place these hearts on the beet hearts.
  4. Cut out tiny hearts out of cucumber and scatter on top. Scatter nuts on top - I used roasted hazelnuts.
  5. Drizzle with your favorite vinaigrette. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Serve immediately.

 

Add grilled chicken for protein and enjoy

Warm Pasta Salad with Shrimp

  • 3 cups uncooked farfalle (bow tie pasta) whole grain 
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice 
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 
  • 1 teaspoon minced fresh garlic 
  • 1/4 cup olive oil 
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 
  • Cooking spray 
  • 12 ounces medium shrimp, peeled and deveined 
  • 1 1/2 cups chopped fresh spinach 
  • 1 cup canned cannellini beans, rinsed and drained 
  • 1/4 cup minced red onion 
  • 2 tablespoons chopped capers 

Preparation

1. Cook pasta according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain.

2. Combine juice, mustard, and garlic in a small bowl, stirring well with a whisk. Gradually add oil, stirring constantly with a whisk. Stir in salt and pepper.

3. Heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add shrimp to pan; cook for 2 minutes or until done. Stir in spinach, cannellini beans, red onion, and 2 tablespoons capers; toss to combine. Add the pasta and juice mixture to shrimp mixture; toss.

KALE SALAD WITH GRILLED EGGPLANT, WHITE BEANS AND FRESH FIGS [VEGAN]

Another Amazing Vegan Salad Packed with Protein SERVES 4

INGREDIENTS

  • 1/4 cup olive oil

  • 2 medium-large cloves garlic

  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika

  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric

  • Pinch sea salt

  • 1 Japanese eggplant, about 10 inches long, ends removed, and cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch thick slices

  • 1/2 of a large orange or yellow bell pepper, cut into 1/3-inch or slightly wider pieces

  • Approximately 1/4 cup red onion, cut into 1/4-inch slices

  • 1-15 ounce can white beans, rinsed and drained

  • 2 generous cups lightly packed fresh kale, stems removed, and torn into bite size pieces (if the farmer’s market doesn’t have any, I purchase the pre-washed, pre-torn kale in a bag and remove any remaining thick stems)

  • 5 ounces plain or garlic-flavored hummus (half of a typical carton–I use Sabra brand Roasted Garlic)

  • Approximately 1/3 cup olive oil

  • 8 small-medium leaves fresh basil chiffonade (stacked, tightly rolled, and sliced into very narrow slivers), or finely chopped

  • 8 small-medium leaves fresh sage chiffonade (stacked, tightly rolled, and sliced into very narrow slivers), or finely chopped

  • Pinch sea salt and freshly ground black pepper or to taste

  • 8 fresh figs, stemmed, and sliced in half vertically

  • 1/4 cup roasted and lightly salted sunflower seeds

  • Optional garnish: sprigs of fresh basil

  1. In a medium-large bowl, whisk together the 1/4 cup olive oil, garlic, smoked paprika, turmeric, and pinch of sea salt. Add the eggplant, bell pepper, and red onion and toss to coat.

  2. Let marinate for a few minutes.

  3. Then, heat a seasoned grill pan over medium high and grill the veggies in batches for 2 to 3 minutes on each side or until nice grill marks develop.

  4. Return them to the bowl they were marinating in.

  5. While the veggies grill, whisk together the hummus, 1/3 cup olive oil, fresh herbs, and salt and pepper to taste.

  6. Add the white beans and kale to the veggies, pour the dressing over and toss to coat.

  7. Arrange the salad on a serving platter or individual plates, nestle the fig halves, flesh side up, over the top, sprinkle with sunflower seeds and garnish, if desired, with fresh basil springs.

  8. Serve immediately.

Summer Salad with Feta, Pecans, Basil, and Blackberry Vinaigrette

Ingredients

  • About 6 cups salad greens, loosely packed
  • ¼ cup torn basil leaves
  • 2 cups cherry tomatoes, halved
  • ¼ cup toasted pecans-chopped
  • ⅓ cup blackberries
  • ¼ cup crumbled feta
  • 3 Tbsp Blackberry Dressing

This tangy blackberry vinaigrette has just the right balance of sweet and savory to rock your tastebuds with a fresh new use for summertime blackberries.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup ripe blackberries
  • 1 Tbsp. honey (or agave if vegan)
  • 2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ½ tsp. dijon

Dressing Instructions

  1. Add all ingredients to a food processor or blender and mix well. If dressing is too thick, you can thin it with a few drops of water. Dressing will keep in fridge for about a week.

Salad instructions

  1. Toss salad greens, basil, tomatoes, and pecans together with dressing.
  2. Gently stir in feta and blackberries.
  3. Serve immediately. 
  4. To make this a more filling meal, add protein like chicken, boiled egg, or beans.

Tuna Salad-Stuffed Tomatoes with Arugula

The tuna in this great-looking stuffed tomato recipe isn't your typical mayo-based affair. The sherry vinaigrette does double duty: it adds fresh flavor to the tuna filling and also dresses the baby arugula and white bean salad.

Ingredients

Tuna Salad-Stuffed Tomatoes with Arugula from Total Wellness Resource Center for the 30 day healthy salad challenge

Tuna Salad-Stuffed Tomatoes with Arugula from Total Wellness Resource Center for the 30 day healthy salad challenge

  • 2 tablespoons extra-Virgin Olive Oil
  • 3 tablespoons sherry vinegar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground 
  • 2 5-ounce cans chunk light tuna in water
  • 1/3 cup chopped celery
  • 1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
  • 1/4 cup chopped Kalamata olives
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 15-ounce can great northern beans, rinsed
  • 8 cups baby arugula

Preparation

Whisk oil, vinegar, salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Transfer 3 tablespoons of the dressing to a large bowl and set aside.Slice enough off the top of each tomato to remove the core (1/2 to 1 inch). Chop enough of the tops to equal 1/2 cup and add to the medium bowl. Scoop out the tomato pulp using a teaspoon or melon baller. (Discard the pulp or save for another use.)Add tuna, celery, onion, olives and thyme to the medium bowl; gently toss to combine. Fill the hollowed tomatoes with the tuna mixture.Add beans and arugula to the dressing in the large bowl and toss to combine. Divide the salad among 4 plates and top each with a stuffed tomato.